Page last updated at 05:09 GMT, Friday, 30 January 2009

Turner landscape sells for 9.1m

The Temple of Jupiter Panellenius. Copyright: Sotheby's
The painting was displayed in London and Paris before the sale

A Turner landscape has fetched 9.1m ($12.9m) in an auction at Sotheby's in New York.

The Temple of Jupiter Panellenius, an oil landscape, achieved the second highest price ever for a painting by the British master.

The painting was secured by an anonymous telephone bidder.

It is one of only three made by Joseph Mallord William Turner which depict ancient Greece and was first exhibited in 1816.

It features an ancient Greek scene of figures dancing a national dance with a temple in the background.

For the past 25 years it has remained in the private collection of fine art dealer Richard Feigen.

It toured Paris, London and Los Angeles before being sold at Sotheby's in New York as part of its Important Old Masters Paintings sale.

On Wednesday, in a separate sale at Christie's in New York, a quartet of Turner paintings sold for close to 1.3m ($1.8m).

The record for a Turner was achieved by Christie's in New York in April 2006 - a Venetian landscape by the artist sold for 25m ($35.9m).

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