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Friday, 1 September, 2000, 12:53 GMT 13:53 UK
Hollywood comes to France
Clint Eastwood
Eastwood has been dubbed Hollywood's "king of the jungle"
Hollywood star Clint Eastwood will receive another lifetime achievement award at the Deauville Film Festival, which starts on Friday.

Eastwood's honour comes hot on the heels of his Golden Lion at the Venice Film Festival, which he received on Tuesday.

The 70-year-old actor and director arrives at the resort in Normandy, France, on Saturday to receive his tribute and present his new film Space Cowboys.

The festival, which runs until 10 September, also plays host to Harrison Ford, Nick Nolte, Morgan Freeman, Samuel L Jackson, Jessica Lange, James Garner, Donald Sutherland, John Singleton, Paul Verhoeven and Tommy Lee Jones.

Hollywood studios use the Deauville Festival of American Cinema to launch their releases in Europe, with many films showing for the first time outside of North America.

It started as an event aimed mainly at enthusiasts, but now attracts top Hollywood stars turned off by Cannes' traditional preference for world and arthouse movies.

It coincides with the Venice festival, which shows films from around the world.

Films showing in Europe for the first time include Hollow Man, What Lies Beneath, Crouching Tiger, Keeping the Faith and Scary Movie.

Space Cowboys
Eastwood presents his movie Space Cowboys at Deauville
Independent films

Independent and low-budget films being showcased in the Panorama section include David Mamet's new offering State and Main, and Darren Aronofsky's Requiem for a Dream.

Irish director Neil Jordan heads up an otherwise mainly French festival jury who will choose between the 10 largely unknown directors presenting films in competition.

They include Karyn Kusama whose Girlfight - set in New York's kick-boxing scene - caused a stir at Cannes in May.

She may follow in the footsteps of last year's Deauville winner - Spike Jonze's Being John Malkovich - which went on to become a major box office success.

Many film-makers are appearing at both Deauville and Venice.

British director Stephen Frears has a different film at each festival: High Fidelity at Deauville and the UK-made Liam at Venice, which runs until 9 September.

Japanese director Takeshi Kitano is presenting his first English-language film, Brother, set in the United States, at both events.

Special tributes are also being organised for Samuel L Jackson, Susan Sarandon, and the Italian producer Dino de Laurentiis.

Musical stars such as Joel Grey, Gregory Hines, Leslie Caron and the legendary child actor Mickey Rooney - now 79 - are also attending as part of a tribute to Broadway and screen musicals.

See also:

31 Aug 00 | Entertainment
Clint's career toasted in Venice
23 Aug 00 | Entertainment
Washington prizes for Clint and Chuck
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