Page last updated at 10:33 GMT, Friday, 2 April 2010 11:33 UK

Three hurt in Mexico as Sir Elton John stage collapses

Sir Elton John performing earlier this year
Sir Elton John's concert will go ahead as planned on Saturday

Three workers were injured when part of the stage for a concert by Sir Elton John at the Chichen Itza ruins in Mexico collapsed during construction.

The British singer was not present at the time of the accident on Wednesday night, which left two men with slight injuries and a third with a broken leg.

Authorities said the Mayan ruins had not been damaged and that Saturday's concert would go ahead as scheduled.

The accident happened when lighting rails fell onto the stage area.

Outside experts have been called in to inspect the structure, a spokesman for Mexico's National Institute of Anthropology and History said.

The incident is not the first to involve a collapsing stage at a musical event.

Chichen Itza ruins
The ruins were voted one of the "New Seven Wonders of the World" in 2007

Last July two people were killed in France when the roof of a stage being built for a Madonna concert in Marseille fell in.

Another man was killed near Edmonton in August when the stage at an open-air country music festival in Canada collapsed in high winds.

Sir Elton was in London this week to mark the fifth anniversary of West End musical Billy Elliot, for which he composed the score.

After Saturday's concert in southern Mexico, the 63-year-old travels to the US for 10 additional dates.



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