BBC Homepage World Service Education
BBC Homepagelow graphics version | feedback | help
BBC News Online
 You are in: Entertainment
Front Page 
World 
UK 
UK Politics 
Business 
Sci/Tech 
Health 
Education 
Entertainment 
Showbiz 
Music 
Film 
Arts 
TV and Radio 
New Media 
Reviews 
Talking Point 
In Depth 
AudioVideo 

Sunday, 30 July, 2000, 10:20 GMT 11:20 UK
Napster revival sparks online frenzy
Napster users
Napster usage has exploded in past 48 hours
Music fans have been rushing to Napster following the failure of the recording industry's attempt to shut down the file-sharing service.

Use of the Napster service has been four to five times heavier than normal, said Allen Tsai of Keynote Systems, which measures traffic on the internet.

Next legal steps
18 August: Deadline for Napster to present written legal arguments
8 September: Deadline for RIAA rebuttal
12 September: Deadline for Napster reply
Hearing on first available court date after 12 September
He said that though traffic might die down in the next few weeks, it would shoot up again the moment the case was back in the courts.

Some industry experts have warned that the decision to take on Napster could end up backfiring on the recording industry by speeding up the pace of trading music on the internet.

On Friday, a US federal appeals court blocked a judge's ruling ordering Napster to stop online trading of songs owned by some of the biggest recording labels in the music industry.

Napster rocks on

The decision means Napster could stay online pending a further resolution of the lawsuit brought by the Recording Industry Association of America, (RIAA).

Napster website
Napster: Stayin' alive, for now
The RIAA is trying to have Napster shut down, accusing it of facilitating wholesale music piracy.

Napster allows users to download software which allows them to search each others' hard drives for MP3 files.

With 20 million users, Napster is the most high-profile of the music-sharing services on the web.

But a side effect of the legal wrangling has been to drive music swappers to lesser-known services like Gnutella, which offer file sharing programmes that are much harder to control.

"The record companies should be careful about what they ask for," said Stephen Bradley of the internet consulting firm Gartner Group.

"Their short-sighted desire to shut down the popular Napster music site will make it nearly impossible to control the online trading of music."

Search BBC News Online

Advanced search options
Launch console
BBC RADIO NEWS
BBC ONE TV NEWS
WORLD NEWS SUMMARY
PROGRAMMES GUIDE

Talking PointTALKING POINT
MP3 verdict
Should Napster be shut down?
See also:

18 Jul 00 | Entertainment
EMI launches digital sales
28 Jul 00 | Entertainment
Courts grant Napster reprieve
27 Jul 00 | Business
Napster shut down
27 Jul 00 | Entertainment
Record industry backs Napster closure
18 Jul 00 | Entertainment
MP3 fans target politicians
28 Jul 00 | Business
MP3.com settles with EMI
06 Jun 00 | Entertainment
MP3: A novice's guide
30 Jun 00 | Sci/Tech
Doing the rights thing
27 Jul 00 | Sci/Tech
Making music and money
Internet links:


The BBC is not responsible for the content of external internet sites

Links to more Entertainment stories are at the foot of the page.


E-mail this story to a friend

Links to more Entertainment stories