Page last updated at 15:20 GMT, Saturday, 27 February 2010

U2 rock all the way to the bank

U2 on stage
U2 are performing under a giant "claw" structure on their world tour

U2 raked in more money than any other music act in the US in 2009, according to Billboard magazine.

The music journal said U2 made $109m (£71m) from touring, record sales and other royalties - almost twice as much as the second best, Bruce Springsteen.

Springsteen took home $58m (£38m), followed by Madonna with $47m (£31m) and rockers AC/DC with $44m (£29m).

U2 are in the middle of a mammoth world tour and touring is the most lucrative activity for artists, Billboard said.

The 360 Degree tour is the most expensive ever staged, but is also playing to larger crowds because they are performing in the round.

A string of younger pop stars - Britney Spears, Pink and the Jonas Brothers - came next on the list.

Coldplay were the most successful British group, at number eight, with takings of $27m (£18m).

Michael Jackson was the top earner from CD and ringtone royalties in 2009, but only made it to number 20 on the overall list, highlighting the importance of touring to a star's pay packet.



Print Sponsor


SEE ALSO
Gig crews give U2 tour thumbs up
09 Feb 10 |  Entertainment
U2 tour hottest US ticket of 2009
31 Dec 09 |  Entertainment
U2 to headline Glastonbury 2010
23 Nov 09 |  Entertainment
Wembley record 'broken by U2 gig'
15 Aug 09 |  Entertainment
U2 brand green criticism 'unfair'
15 Aug 09 |  Entertainment
U2 stages 'to become gig venues'
14 Aug 09 |  Entertainment

RELATED BBC LINKS

RELATED INTERNET LINKS
The BBC is not responsible for the content of external internet sites


FEATURES, VIEWS, ANALYSIS
Has China's housing bubble burst?
How the world's oldest clove tree defied an empire
Why Royal Ballet principal Sergei Polunin quit

BBC iD

Sign in

BBC navigation

Copyright © 2020 BBC. The BBC is not responsible for the content of external sites. Read more.

This page is best viewed in an up-to-date web browser with style sheets (CSS) enabled. While you will be able to view the content of this page in your current browser, you will not be able to get the full visual experience. Please consider upgrading your browser software or enabling style sheets (CSS) if you are able to do so.

Americas Africa Europe Middle East South Asia Asia Pacific