Page last updated at 13:27 GMT, Friday, 29 January 2010

Caligula director Tinto Brass plans 'first 3D porn'

Tinto Brass
Brass fell out with Guccione over the final cut of the 1979 film

Caligula director Tinto Brass, has announced plans to make the world's first 3D pornographic film, according to the Hollywood Reporter.

Brass plans to "revisit an abandoned project about a Roman emperor that was ruined by Americans", suggesting that the film will be a remake of Caligula.

The 1979 film, starring Helen Mirren, was a collaboration between Brass and the Penthouse publisher Bob Guccione.

Critically panned, it also starred the late John Gielgud and Peter O'Toole.

US author Gore Vidal, who wrote the original script, was so keen to distance himself from the infamous film, that he took legal action and had his name removed from the project.

Pagan Rome

The film concerns the rise and fall of Roman Emperor Gaius Caesar Germanicus, better known as Caligula, played by British actor Malcolm McDowell.

Italian director Brass and Guccione reportedly fell out over the final cut, with Guccione secretly adding a number of explicit sexual scenes in post-production.

Guccione later defended his decision, saying he wanted the film to reflect the reality of pagan Rome.

Following uproar over the film's explicit violent and sexual content, an edited version was produced. Both versions are currently available on DVD.

Brass's 3D version, the first 3D film to be made in Italy, will begin shooting in May.



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