Page last updated at 11:09 GMT, Tuesday, 1 December 2009

Pete Doherty apologises for singing 'Nazi' anthem

Pete Doherty
Doherty was formerly a member of British pop band the Libertines

Singer Pete Doherty has apologised after being asked to leave a stage in Germany for performing a verse of the national anthem with Nazi connotations.

Doherty, 30, was booed after singing "Deutschland, Deutschland ueber alles" at a concert in Munich on Saturday that was broadcast live on Bavarian radio.

A spokesperson for the singer said he was "unaware of the controversy" about the anthem's rarely used first verse.

"He deeply apologises if he has caused any offence," he said.

The first verse of Germany's national anthem - which translates as "Germany, Germany above everything" - has been ignored since the fall of the Third Reich.

The third verse - which begins "Unity and justice and liberty for the German fatherland" - has been used since East and West Germany unified in 1990.

Public radio station Bayerischer Rundfunk stopped broadcasting from the on3 music festival when Doherty began his version of the anthem.

Video footage of the incident shows him incorporating the song with an eccentric rendition of 'Hit the Road Jack'.

Onlookers can be heard reacting angrily to the refrain, which was dropped after World War II.

According to local reports, the Babyshambles star performed five more songs before being ushered from the stage.

In a letter printed on the on3 website, Doherty's manager Adrian Hunter said the singer had "wanted to celebrate his appearance in Munich by assimilating and integrating with the crowd".

"Pete himself is from Jewish descent and has fought against racism and fascism with numerous organisations," the letter said.

"This is a subject he feels very strongly about."



Print Sponsor


SEE ALSO
Doherty faces trial over driving
01 Oct 09 |  Gloucestershire
Swiss TV in German anthem blunder
18 Jun 08 |  Europe
Rock stars sign up for web comedy
05 May 09 |  Entertainment

RELATED INTERNET LINKS
The BBC is not responsible for the content of external internet sites



FEATURES, VIEWS, ANALYSIS
Has China's housing bubble burst?
How the world's oldest clove tree defied an empire
Why Royal Ballet principal Sergei Polunin quit

BBC navigation

BBC © 2014 The BBC is not responsible for the content of external sites. Read more.

This page is best viewed in an up-to-date web browser with style sheets (CSS) enabled. While you will be able to view the content of this page in your current browser, you will not be able to get the full visual experience. Please consider upgrading your browser software or enabling style sheets (CSS) if you are able to do so.

Americas Africa Europe Middle East South Asia Asia Pacific