Page last updated at 13:53 GMT, Thursday, 22 October 2009 14:53 UK

Big Ben face to go from ITV News

Mark Austin and Julie Etchingham
News at Ten returned last year

ITV's News at Ten is to drop the familiar image of Big Ben's clockface from the programme titles as part of a show revamp, ITN has announced.

The well known bongs, which come from the clock's bell, will remain and be incorporated into the opening soundtrack as part of the rebrand.

The decision to drop the clock tower has been made to help engage with viewers who do not live in London.

A spokesman said: "We didn't want the news to be too London-centric."

'Heritage'

The changes will be made from 2 November.

"While Big Ben won't be in the title sequence, we felt that we needed to retain the heritage that people recognise so in the studio there will be a clock face," the spokesman added.

The new studio set will incorporate the signature yellow used throughout ITV's branding.

Mark Austin and Julie Etchingham will continue to present the show.

News at Ten was first dropped in 1999 after nearly 32 years on air, to make room for films to be aired in prime time.

It returned again for three years from 2001, after which ITV settled on 2230 as the time for its main news bulletin.

But last year the bulletin returned at 2200, which meant it went head-to-head with the BBC's Ten O'clock News.



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