Page last updated at 09:15 GMT, Tuesday, 11 August 2009 10:15 UK

Radiohead 'to stop making albums'

Thom Yorke
Radiohead are releasing a song dedicated to Harry Patch

Radiohead frontman Thom Yorke has said recording another album would "kill" the band because making records has become a "real drag" to them.

Speaking to US magazine The Believer, the singer said their last release, In Rainbows, worked because the group had a clear vision for the record.

"None of us want to go into that creative hoo-ha of a long-play record again. Not straight off," he said.

The band may start releasing one-off songs rather than full-length albums.

'Profound effect'

Yorke said making an album was hard, but it worked with their last record, because "we had a fixed idea about where we were going".

He added: "But we've all said that we can't possibly dive into that again. It'll kill us."

Radiohead's latest song was written in honour of Harry Patch, the First World War veteran who died last month aged 111.

The download only single, Harry Patch (In Memory Of), was inspired by a radio interview with the former soldier recorded in 2005.

Yorke said: "The way he talked about war had a profound effect on me.

"It became the inspiration for a song that we happened to record a few weeks before his death.

"I very much hope the song does justice to his memory as the last survivor."

All profits of the song, which was premiered on BBC Radio 4's Today programme last week, will go to the Royal British Legion.



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