Page last updated at 09:58 GMT, Thursday, 9 October 2008 10:58 UK

Foos fight McCain over song use

Dave Grohl of the Foo Fighters
The Foo Fighters say the use of track "perverts the original sentiment"

US rock band the Foo Fighters have told John McCain to stop using song My Hero in his presidential campaign, saying it "tarnishes" the track.

The band said it had been "appropriated without our knowledge".

But a Republican spokesman said the party had licences to play "millions of different songs".

Acts including Heart have all asked Mr McCain to stop using their songs, while soul singer Sam Moore has asked the same of Democrat rival Barack Obama.

The Foo Fighters, fronted by former Nirvana drummer Dave Grohl, said they found out their song was being used through reports.

Cease-and-desist

The band said in a statement: "The saddest thing about this is that My Hero was written as a celebration of the common man and his extraordinary potential.

"To have it appropriated without our knowledge and used in a manner that perverts the original sentiment of the lyric just tarnishes the song."

The saddest thing about this is that My Hero was written as a celebration of the common man and his extraordinary potential
Foo Fighters

Republican spokesman Brian Rogers said the campaign "respects copyright".

"Accordingly, this campaign has obtained and paid for licences from performing rights organisations, giving us permission to play millions of different songs, including My Hero."

Earlier this month, Heart singers Ann and Nancy Wilson said they had sent a cease-and-desist letter asking the Republicans not to use their 1977 track Barracuda.

They called in lawyers after vice-presidential candidate Sarah Palin used the track at a party rally.

And, in August, it was announced that singer Jackson Browne, 59, was suing McCain for using his hit song Running on Empty in an advert for his campaign.

Browne, who is seeking more than $75,000 (40,000) in damages, claimed the advert was an infringement of copyright and will lead people to conclude he endorses McCain.

The Republicans called the legal action a "big to-do about nothing".



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