Page last updated at 16:59 GMT, Thursday, 17 July 2008 17:59 UK

China ban for 'threatening' stars

Bjork in concert
Bjork's cry came after a performance of song Declare Independence

Entertainers from outside China who have attended events that "threaten national sovereignty" will be banned from the country, its government says.

Any artists who "whip up ethnic hatred" during performances would also be banned, the ministry of culture said,

The announcement comes after Bjork shouted "Tibet, Tibet" at a Shanghai concert in March.

Talk of Tibetan independence is considered taboo in China, which has ruled the territory since 1951.

"Any artistic group or individual who have ever engaged in activities which threaten our national sovereignty will not be allowed in," the ministry said in a statement on its website.

The ban was extended to entertainers who "threaten national unity", "advocate obscenity or feudalism and superstition" or who "violate religious policy or cultural norms", the statement added.

Encore approval

Bjork's cry came after a powerful performance of her song Declare Independence at the concert.

China's culture ministry said after the outburst that it "broke Chinese law and hurt Chinese people's feelings".

And it pledged to "further tighten controls".

The latest announcement follows the banning of pop festivals and the tightening of rules on outdoor events in the months leading up to the Olympics as the government fears embarrassing protests from crowds.

The ministry has said that even encores must be approved in advance.

Taiwanese pop star Chang Hui-Mei was banned from playing in China for a year after she sang Taiwan's national anthem during an inauguration ceremony for the island's president in 2000.

China considers Taiwan, which has governed its own affairs for half a century, part of its territory.

Western acts 'welcome' in China
13 Mar 08 |  Entertainment
China to crack down on pop stars
07 Mar 08 |  Entertainment
Bjork makes 'free Tibet' gesture
04 Mar 08 |  Asia-Pacific
Regions and territories: Tibet
23 Apr 08 |  Country profiles

The BBC is not responsible for the content of external internet sites

Has China's housing bubble burst?
How the world's oldest clove tree defied an empire
Why Royal Ballet principal Sergei Polunin quit


Sign in

BBC navigation

Copyright © 2016 BBC. The BBC is not responsible for the content of external sites. Read more.

This page is best viewed in an up-to-date web browser with style sheets (CSS) enabled. While you will be able to view the content of this page in your current browser, you will not be able to get the full visual experience. Please consider upgrading your browser software or enabling style sheets (CSS) if you are able to do so.

Americas Africa Europe Middle East South Asia Asia Pacific