Page last updated at 07:37 GMT, Thursday, 17 April 2008 08:37 UK

Talking Shop: The Script

With their soulful sound, hip-hop sensibility and slick R&B production, The Script hardly fit the standard Irish boy band mould.

The Script
The Script plan to release their debut album in August

Having cut their teeth in Los Angeles working with the likes of Rodney Jerkins and The Neptunes, though, it is unlikely this trio of twentysomething Dubliners have Westlife or the reformed Boyzone in their sights.

Having travelled the UK supporting the Hoosiers, Glen Power (drums and acoustic guitar), Mark Sheehan (guitar and vocals) and Danny O'Donaghue (keyboards and lead vocals) are now targeting the charts with their catchy debut track We Cry (out 28 April).

It has not been plain sailing for the threesome, however. O'Donaghue suffered a collapsed lung in January, while Power took a tumble in November that left him with a fractured skull.


So how exactly did your respective mishaps occur?

Glen Power: I went into my local pub, went to the toilet and literally woke up in hospital - I'd slipped and banged my head on the sink. I'd fractured my skull and had to have a blood clot removed. I was really lucky, though: I could have had a stroke.

Danny O'Donaghue: I woke up one morning and felt this heavy feeling from the inside. I laid down but the pain didn't subside, so I went to my local GP. He rushed me into the ER room and within an hour I'd gone through surgery. My lungs are my money-makers so it was quite a scary thing to happen.

Is that why your debut single is called We Cry?

Danny O'Donaghue and Mark Sheehan of The Script
O'Donaghue and Sheehan grew up in the James Street area of Dublin
Mark Sheehan: No, we don't write songs in 10 minutes! A song takes nurturing; it's an evolving thing. There is a whole lifetime in our songs.

D O'D: There is not a lot of hope in the song. But out of all the things that have gone wrong in our lives, the message is "together we cry". As long as we're here together we can find a way to share the burden.

Things seem to be going right now, though. For those yet to hear your music, how would you describe your sound?

MS: Coming from Ireland you naturally have one ear on England and the other on America - you're between those two worlds. The great British songbook has amazing lyrics, while America tends to be more beat- and groove-driven. It's the mix of the two that gives us our sound.

D O'D: There are so many people who are going on iTunes now to mix and match songs from lots of different genres. Why isn't there a band that can do the same thing? You have to be rock or hip-hop or pop. That's what excites us about The Script.

MS: It's okay to jump genres sometimes and experiment, as long as you stay loyal to your song and the core emotion is being hit.

So where do you see yourselves in five years' time?

U2
The Irish threesome cite U2 as one of their biggest inspirations
D O'D: You've always got to be ambitious; we'll take on anything people put in front of us. Making music and playing every day is the only thing that's going to satisfy this band.

MS: I love the reaction we're getting from our live show, so I can only hope and dream that in five years' time we'll be a stadium act.

What, like U2? They must have been a huge inspiration.

MS: They've definitely been ambassadors for Irish music. They've got to the top, and they're still making history.

GP: When I was in school I used to look at them and say, "I want to do that."

D O'D: They showed the impossible could become possible.

The Script can be heard on BBC Radio 2's Music Club on 19 April at 2000 BST. The band were speaking to BBC News entertainment reporter Neil Smith.


SEE ALSO
Talking Shop: Counting Crows
27 Mar 08 |  Entertainment
Talking Shop: Estelle
25 Mar 08 |  Entertainment
Talking Shop: Bryan Adams
17 Mar 08 |  Entertainment

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