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Last Updated: Thursday, 6 March 2008, 17:24 GMT
Take That 'top concert resales'
Take That
Take That generated 12.8m in online resales, Tixdaq said
Tickets for concerts by Take That and Led Zeppelin were the most in demand on internet auction sites last year, according to research firm Tixdaq.

"Second-hand" Take That tickets generated 12.8m in online sales across the UK's 25 biggest sites, it said.

Led Zeppelin's gig at London's O2, meanwhile, produced the highest average ticket price at 707.97 despite measures to prevent resale, it added.

Tixdaq monitors secondary ticket sales on the websites.

MOST EXPENSIVE RESOLD TICKETS
Led Zeppelin - 707.97
Electric Proms: Paul McCartney - 498.14
Electric Picnic - 360.96
The Liverpool Sound - Paul McCartney - 330.00
Liza Minnelli - 261.93
Source: Tixdaq

Tickets for Paul McCartney's gig at the BBC Electric Proms were the second most expensive at an average of 498.14 per ticket, while third were tickets for Ireland's Electric Picnic festival, fetching an average of 360.96 each.

Tixdaq spokesman Will Muirhead said secondary ticket exchanges had created a huge new market in the last couple of years.

"No wonder artists are concerned that they do not generally share in the proceeds," he added.

In January, a committee of MPs said that artists and sports bodies should share profits from tickets resold on internet auction sites.

BIGGEST GROSSING EVENTS
Take That - 12.9m
T in the Park - 8.7m
V Festival - 6.8m
Spice Girls - 5.3m
Reading Festival - 5m
Source: Tixdaq

In a report on touting, they stopped short of calling for a ban, but said online touts must "clean up their act" because they exploit fans.

The Culture, Media and Sport select committee said up to 40% of tickets were being sold on the internet.

The Resale Rights Society (RRS) - representing the managers of the Arctic Monkeys, Radiohead and Robbie Williams and more than 400 other acts - is lobbying for a levy to be added to resold tickets.

It says that the existing situation - where big profits can be made by ticket sellers with nothing going to the organisers or rights owners - was "unfair and must be addressed".

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