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Last Updated: Tuesday, 6 November 2007, 11:19 GMT
Page injury dominates rock awards
By Neil Smith
Entertainment reporter, BBC News at the Classic Rock awards

All eyes were on Led Zeppelin guitarist Jimmy Page's fractured finger at the Classic Rock awards - the reason why his band's eagerly awaited reunion concert has been put back until next month.

Led Zeppelin's Jimmy Page
Page arrived with the little finger on his left hand discreetly bandaged
There were only two topics of conversation at Monday night's Classic Rock Roll of Honour awards in central London.

Which finger had Led Zeppelin guitarist Jimmy Page broken, and how exactly did he do it?

Strange to think a simple fracture should be such a talking point at an event attended by some of the rock world's biggest names.

Given that the mishap forced the postponement of the year's most keenly anticipated concert, however, it was hardly surprising.

Even Aerosmith frontman Steve Tyler referred to it as he presented Page with his Living Legend accolade at the end of the evening.

Tumble

Arriving with his left hand discreetly lodged in his trouser pocket, the grey-haired musician at first seemed reluctant to be drawn on the subject.

Eventually, though, a bandaged pinky was revealed and the reason behind it - a tumble he had taken while walking in his garden a week ago.

Aerosmith's Steve Tyler
Aerosmith's Hyde Park concert in June was named event of the year
"I happened to trip over a stone slab," he revealed. "I didn't just come down on my hand, I came down on other parts of my body as well.

"But of course, it was the hand that had a bit of an injury to it."

Had it happened to his right hand, he added, he "might have got away with it".

"It's the last thing I would have wanted to happen to anybody, let alone me," he said.

"All I can do is convey my apologies to the fans and anyone who has been inconvenienced."

'Chemistry'

The lucky fans who managed to obtain tickets to the 10 December concert at London's O2 arena will not mind waiting an extra two weeks, however.

What is a fortnight after the 19 years it has taken Page, lead singer Robert Plant and bassist John Paul Jones to get back together?

Alice Cooper
Rock veteran Cooper was on hand to collect a DVD award
Historic tensions between the legendary band's surviving members led many to assume this day would never come.

Page, however, was quick to assure reporters that the band's "great chemistry" was still in place.

"The hardest thing was actually getting in a room together after all those years," he said.

"Once we got in there it was fantastic - the power of the music took over everything."

Page also joked that, had his injury not occurred, the band "probably would have had two albums done by now".

'Hostage'

Now in their third year, the Classic Rock Roll of Honour may not have the swagger of the Q awards or the glamour of the Brits.

And with a guest list comprising such rock wrinklies as Alice Cooper, Pink Floyd's Nick Mason and Rick Parfitt and Francis Rossi from Status Quo, the event certainly lived up to its classic tag.

What was self-evident, though, was a shared delight in live performance and the genuine respect and affection for the Living Legend in their midst.

"As a kid I was really into rock and roll - it took me hostage," Page said as he accepted his honour.

"Rock music took me by the throat and messed me up inside. Everyone in here has been taken the same way."

SEE ALSO
Living legend Page 'on the mend'
06 Nov 07 |  Entertainment
Broken finger delays Zeppelin gig
02 Nov 07 |  Entertainment
Zeppelin 'may make new material'
17 Oct 07 |  Entertainment
Fans get hold of Zeppelin tickets
02 Oct 07 |  Entertainment
Led Zeppelin confirm reunion gig
12 Sep 07 |  Entertainment

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