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Monday, 3 April, 2000, 15:56 GMT 16:56 UK
Glastonbury given green light
Glastonbury
Glastonbury crowd goes mad for it
Organisers of the Glastonbury Festival have had their licence renewed, after being warned they could lose it if they didn't improve security.

There were claims that last year thousands of fans had illegally entered using fake hand stamps and that some unscrupulous festival staff were stamping people's hands for a small fee.

A new system has now been put in place by organiser Michael Eavis, and Mendip councillors will now decide whether it is good enough.

Pilton Parish Council, is also calling for a reduction in the numbers allowed on site. They are calling for a capacity of 90,000 instead of the proposed 105,000


Michael Eavis
Eavis: Granted licence to thrill
In 1986, 1987, and 1989, site owner Michael Eavis was refused a licence, but he took the authority to court, and was successful on each occasion.

The festival celebrates its 30th anniversary this year, with veteran rocker David Bowie the top attraction - 29 years after his first appearance.

Rumour

The full line-up is not likely to be known until 1 June, but All Saints, Tom Jones and Blondie are among those rumoured to be joining the bill.

It is a far cry from the very first event, back in 1970 when T-Rex played Worthy Farm to a crowd of 1,500 hippies after being approached by Eavis, who inherited the 150-acre site at Pilton.


Manic Street Preachers
Flashback to 1999: Manics entertain revellers
Eavis is still at the helm, but these days the crowds are in excess of 100,000 and as well as the bands, festival-goers can enjoy circus acts, big-screen movies, comedians and hundreds of stalls, selling everything from clothing to curries.

The only thing that cannot be predicted is the weather. Last year saw a relatively dry event, but 1997 and 1998 became mudbaths after days of torrential rain.

Tickets priced 87 are expected to go on sale as soon as councillors give the green light to this year's event, which takes place on 23, 24 and 25 June. More information is available on the official Glastonbury website.

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See also:

28 Jun 99 | Glastonbury 1999
Eavis' labour of love
14 Mar 00 | Entertainment
T time for Macy and Travis
23 Jun 99 | Glastonbury 1999
Three decades of Glastonbury
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