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Last Updated: Tuesday, 6 March 2007, 12:30 GMT
395,000 register for Glastonbury
Fans at Glastonbury in 2005
The Who, Arctic Monkeys and Bjork will play at the event in June
A total of 395,000 people have registered their details for this summer's Glastonbury Festival under the event's new ticketing system.

The application process, which ran for five weeks, does not guarantee entry.

This is because only 145,000 tickets will be available for the event when public sales begin on 1 April.

But organisers said the storage of names and photographs would vastly cut the chances of touts obtaining passes and reselling them at higher prices.

"All the feedback we've got is that people have found the online system really user-friendly," said a spokesman for the festival, who added that the technology had "never crashed" at any stage.

"It's quite hard to tell until those tickets are used at the gate but it's a good start."

He said that although it meant about 250,000 people who had registered would not actually receive tickets, "it hasn't increased the number of people being rejected".

"The alternative would be that everybody would go and apply on 1 April," he said.

And he argued that it was "a small price to pay" to stop real fans being ripped off.

"It's such a fundamental issue. If we didn't have this system, they'd be up on eBay for 500 or 1,000 and it just isn't fair," he told the BBC News website.

The festival will be held from 22 to 24 June.


SEE ALSO
Call for action on ticket touts
05 Mar 07 |  Entertainment
Glastonbury fans given more time
28 Feb 07 |  Entertainment
Kaiser Chiefs playing Glastonbury
27 Feb 07 |  Entertainment
Eavis' delight at ticket scheme
14 Feb 07 |  Somerset
The Who set for Glastonbury gig
25 Jan 07 |  Entertainment
Arctics to headline Glastonbury
24 Jan 07 |  Entertainment

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