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Last Updated: Friday, 9 February 2007, 11:26 GMT
TV diet expert in borrowing boom
Gillian McKeith
McKeith 's book is based on her Channel 4 show
A boom in people borrowing self-help books from libraries has put TV diet expert Gillian McKeith at the top of the most read non-fiction titles.

Her big selling book, You Are What You Eat, is at number one and the cookbook of the same name is at number three.

Hypnotist Paul McKenna is in fourth and fifth place. The only title in the top five that is not a self-help book is a memoir by actress Sheila Hancock.

Children's writer Jacqueline Wilson is top of the most borrowed authors list.

It is the fourth year running the author of The Illustrated Mum and the Story of Tracy Beaker has appeared at number one.

MOST BORROWED NON-FICTION TITLES 2005/06
1. Gillian McKeith - You Are What You Eat
2. Sheila Hancock - The Two of Us: My Life with John Thaw
3. Gillian McKeith - You Are What You Eat Cookbook
4. Paul McKenna - Change Your Life in Seven Days
5. Paul McKenna - I Can Make You Thin
6. Maura Murphy - Don't Wake Me at Doyle
7. Jamie Oliver - Jamie's Dinners
8. Bill Bryson - A Short History of Nearly Everything
9. Dan Waddell - Who Do You Think You Are?
10. Antony Worrall Thompson, Mabel Blades and Jane Suthering - Antony Worrall Thompson's GI Diet
Public Lending Right organisation

Janet and Allen Ahlberg, Mick Inkpen and Roald Dahl, who also write for the younger audience, feature in the top 10 too.

Overall, Dan Brown's The Da Vinci Code was the most popular borrowed book for adults, and for children, the JK Rowling's Harry Potter and the Half Blood Prince was favourite.

The trend of book borrowing for the non-fiction has changed over the last decade.

Ten years ago, the most popular titles included Immediate Action by Andy McNab, A Brief History of Time, by Stephen Hawking and Jung Chang's Wild Swans.

The library book statistics were collected by the Public Lending Right (PLR) organisation.

"The data reveals our national preoccupation with self-image and our growing obsession with who we are and what we look like," said a PLR spokeswoman.




SEE ALSO
Potter book tops borrowing list
09 Feb 07 |  Scotland

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