[an error occurred while processing this directive]
BBC News
watch One-Minute World News
Last Updated: Monday, 25 December 2006, 15:52 GMT
The influence of soul 'Godfather'
James Brown
Brown died after being admitted to hospital with severe pneumonia
Soul legend James Brown, who has died at the age of 73, received praise throughout his 50-year career for his ground-breaking and inspirational styles.

He was famous for hits such as I Got You (I Feel Good), Get Up I Feel Like Being a Sex Machine and Papa's Got a Brand New Bag.

Leading figures from the music industry have frequently cited the "Godfather of Soul" as an influence on their careers.

CHUCK D, RAPPER, PUBLIC ENEMY

From Public Enemy's website:

To explain the fever pitch that James Brown records set, of the foundations of hip-hop and rap music, it would [mean] using words still not invented.

Today, hip-hop seems a far distance from the mighty funk the man set upon all of us.

Flavor Flav and Chuck D of Public Enemy in 1994
Chuck D (right) shot to fame with hard-hitting rap group Public Enemy
I was speechless when I met him backstage at BET's [Black Entertainment Television's] 20th anniversary.

He was viewing a monitor as he was set to go on with singer Ginuwine, who was dedicating a medley to the Godfather of Soul.

I was fixin' to get my camera, and when I turned around he was gone, ready to do his thing.

I couldn't find him after that. But still, I was blown away that he complimented me on 'my' stuff and even knew my
name.

And to the Associated Press:

James presented obviously the best grooves.

To this day, there has been no-one near as funky. No-one's coming even close.

MICHAEL JACKSON, POP STAR

At the BET Awards in 2003, where Brown received a lifetime achievement prize:

Nobody has influenced me more than this man.

LL COOL J, RAPPER AND ACTOR

During a ceremony at the Kennedy Arts Center in Washington DC:

He broke down mental and social barriers and made it possible for me, a black kid from Queens, to stand in front of presidents and say: 'Say it loud, I'm black and I'm proud.'

ALFRED "PEE WEE" ELLIS, JAMES BROWN'S SAXOPHONIST

From the PBS series American Masters:

When you heard James Brown was coming to town, you stopped what you were doing and started saving your
money.

BOB YOUNG, MAYOR OF AUGUSTA

Interviewed by the NPR radio programme All Things Considered:

I was a disc jockey back in the mid-60s. James Brown was a frequent visitor to Augusta.

He would have sold-out shows at the City Auditorium and I worked the overnight shift, so after the shows, he would come by the radio station.

We would just talk for extended periods of time on the air and play a lot of James Brown music.

We really started to develop a much closer relationship through those late-night discussions on the radio. I have fond memories of those.



SEE ALSO
Brown fans in party mood in Harlem
29 Dec 06 |  Entertainment

RELATED BBC LINKS

RELATED INTERNET LINKS
The BBC is not responsible for the content of external internet sites



FEATURES, VIEWS, ANALYSIS
Has China's housing bubble burst?
How the world's oldest clove tree defied an empire
Why Royal Ballet principal Sergei Polunin quit

PRODUCTS & SERVICES

Americas Africa Europe Middle East South Asia Asia Pacific