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Last Updated: Friday, 7 October 2005, 15:27 GMT 16:27 UK
Robbie defends Moss against media
Robbie Williams
Williams was addicted to cocaine and alcohol after leaving Take That
Pop star Robbie Williams has defended model Kate Moss over allegations she snorted cocaine, saying she has been treated unfairly by the UK press.

Williams attacked the media for their coverage of the claims, which he said could have led Moss to attempt suicide.

The singer, who has undergone treatment for drug addiction in the past, said: "What she does in her private life should be her private life."

Scotland Yard is investigating claims that Moss took the class A-drug.

Speaking at a press conference in Berlin to promote the launch of his new album, Williams said Moss was "an absolute icon".

"She's done nothing wrong," he said.

Addiction treatment

"I think the media have got a lot to answer for.

"We're talking about a woman who has never harmed anyone or hurt anyone and who has never pretended to be anyone she isn't."

Model Kate Moss at the Glastonbury festival in 2005
Moss is reported to have checked into rehab in Arizona

The model has lost lucrative contracts with Chanel, H&M and Burberry after the Daily Mirror newspaper first reported the claims about drug taking.

Williams, who releases new album Intensive Care later this month, underwent treatment for drug addiction in the late 1990s after his friend Sir Elton John had him admitted to a rehab clinic.

In an interview last year, he said he only gave up drugs and alcohol because they made him too fat.

Meanwhile, W magazine has put Moss on the cover of its November issue, making it the first fashion publication to do so since the drugs allegations.


SEE ALSO:
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02 Oct 05 |  Entertainment
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