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Thursday, August 19, 1999 Published at 11:26 GMT 12:26 UK


Entertainment

Bardot savages Chirac and China

Flashback to 1995: Bardot on the campaign rail

Screen legend-turned-animal rights activist Brigitte Bardot has launched a savage attack against China for its "disgusting" treatment of animals and told French President Jacques Chirac to stop "crawling" to Asia.

In a hostile letter to Chinese President Jiang Zemin, published in French magazine VSD, she accused the Chinese of torturing bears and killing the world's last tigers and rhinos to make aphrodisiacs.


[ image: Bardot's devoted her life to animal rights]
Bardot's devoted her life to animal rights
"China once again disgusts the world, portraying the image of a cruel, perverted people devoid of any feelings towards animals," she said.

Bardot, 64, who lives in the south of France and defends numerous animal rights causes, appealed to Chirac to come to her aid.

"He should stop crawling around in front of these Asiatics. He too must make them understand in a strict, firm fashion, that a society and civilisation must not evolve in this way."

Controversial campaigner

Bardot has courted controversy a number of times in recent years to bring attention to her protests.

Last year she was convicted by a French court of provoking racial hatred after attacking Muslims over the way they slaughtered sheep.


[ image: Dogs are widely available in South Korean markets]
Dogs are widely available in South Korean markets
She is also campaigning against a move in South Korea to introduce a new law which would make it legal to eat dog meat.

Contrary to popular opinion, the sale and consumption of dog meat is illegal in South Korea.

The ban was introduced before the 1998 Seoul Olympics as a result of government fears that the country would suffer from bad publicity.

But in a letter sent to the 1960s sex symbol this week, supporters of the new dog-eating law slammed Bardot for criticising Korean eating habits when her own nation was partial to snails and frogs' legs.



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