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Last Updated: Wednesday, 10 August 2005, 10:20 GMT 11:20 UK
Stones 'slate Bush' in album song
Sir Mick Jagger and Keith Richards of the Rolling Stones
Sweet Neo-Con is one of 16 songs on the new Stones album
A track on the Rolling Stones' upcoming album A Bigger Bang reportedly attacks interventionist supporters of President George Bush known as neo-conservatives.

"You call yourself a Christian, I call you a hypocrite," Sir Mick Jagger sings in Sweet Neo Con, one of 16 tracks featured on the September release.

"It is direct," Jagger is quoted as saying in US magazine Newsweek.

Jagger reportedly added that bandmate Keith Richards, who lives in the US, was "a bit worried" about a backlash.

The song was not featured on a 12-track advance CD sent out by the veteran British rockers to music critics.

Contentious

Vice-President Dick Cheney, Defence Secretary Donald Rumsfeld and Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice are considered by some to be leading neo-conservatives.

However, the term is a contentious one in the US.

The BBC's Mark Mardell has described neo-cons as "full-blooded 21st Century nationalists" who "insist America's mission is to bring democracy to the world".

The Rolling Stones are currently rehearsing in Toronto for their 40-date world tour, which begins in Boston on 21 August.


SEE ALSO:
Stones tracks sold online first
04 Aug 05 |  Entertainment
Rolling Stones back with a Bang
28 Jul 05 |  Entertainment
Rolling Stones back on the road
11 May 05 |  Entertainment
Is Blair a neo-Conservative?
02 Apr 03 |  UK Politics


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