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Last Updated: Sunday, 11 April, 2004, 15:09 GMT 16:09 UK
Dylan 'reveals origin of anthem'
Bob Dylan
The Times They Are A-Changin' became an anthem in the 60s
Music legend Bob Dylan has admitted that one of his most famous songs was originally a Scottish folk tune, reports The Scotsman.

Dylan - set to play in Scotland this summer - revealed The Times They Are A-Changin' was copied from other songs.

"It's probably from an old Scottish folk song. That's the folk tradition. You use what's handed down," he said.

Dylan's song was adopted by millions of anti-war campaigners in the 1960s and became an anthem for a generation.

Advert debut

Last week the 62-year-old was in the news when he made his debut in a US TV commercial, promoting lingerie brand Victoria's Secret.

His face was intercut with shots of scantily-clad models.

Executives had already chosen his 1997 track Love Sick for the ad, and invited Dylan to make a cameo appearance.

The advert will air in the US over the coming weeks.

The music Hall of Fame veteran has yet to comment on why he decided to accept the offer to appear in the commercial.

It is the first time in a career spanning more than 40 years that Dylan has appeared in a TV advertisement.

But his song The Times They Are A-Changin' was used on a Bank of Montreal commercial in 1996, which prompted criticism that the singer had sold out.


SEE ALSO:
Dylan debuts in lingerie advert
07 Apr 04  |  Entertainment
Dylan tops London Fleadh festival
05 Apr 04  |  Entertainment
Dylan tracks get reggae treatment
17 Mar 04  |  Entertainment


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