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Last Updated: Wednesday, 4 June, 2003, 07:16 GMT 08:16 UK
Manilow breaks his nose
Barry Manilow
Manilow's hits include Copacabana and Mandy
Veteran singer Barry Manilow has revealed he has broken his nose after walking into a wall.

The star - who is almost as famous for the size of his nose as his hit songs - injured himself as he got up in the middle of the night while at his Californian home.

He said that in a sleep haze he managed to walk into a wall and knock himself out for four hours.

Keeping his sense of humour, he joked: "I may have to have my nose fixed, and with this nose, it's going to require major surgery."

The singer was at his Palm Springs home when the mishap happened after returning from a stay in Malibu where he was working on a new album for Bette Midler.

No lasting damage

He said that when he awoke in the night he thought he was still in Malibu and "veered to the left instead of the right and slammed right into the wall".

Manilow, 56, said that other than a broken nose, which was left swollen, there was no lasting damage following the accident.

He is continuing to work on Midler's tribute to the late Rosemary Clooney as well as making his own album, Two Nights Live.

Manilow started out working for Midler in the early 1970s as a pianist and musical director, before launching his own singing career.

Some of his biggest and most enduring hits include Mandy, Can't Smile Without You and Copacabana.




SEE ALSO:
'Manilow' woman is found
17 Jan 03  |  England
Beckham's debt to Barry
01 Mar 02  |  Entertainment


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