BBC NEWS Americas Africa Europe Middle East South Asia Asia Pacific
BBCi NEWS   SPORT   WEATHER   WORLD SERVICE   A-Z INDEX     

BBC News World Edition
    You are in: Entertainment  
News Front Page
Africa
Americas
Asia-Pacific
Europe
Middle East
South Asia
UK
Business
Entertainment
Science/Nature
Technology
Health
-------------
Talking Point
-------------
Country Profiles
In Depth
-------------
Programmes
-------------
BBC Sport
BBC Weather
SERVICES
-------------
EDITIONS
 Thursday, 23 January, 2003, 16:43 GMT
Robin Gibb finds solace in music
The Bee Gees
Robin (centre) says the music will go on
Bee Gee Robin Gibb has spoken of the comfort he gets from music following the death of his twin brother Maurice.

He said music had become a "therapy" after the unexpected death of his brother just two weeks ago.

"I buried myself in my work as a therapy... because to me (Maurice's death) is still very, very fresh," he told BBC Radio 4's Woman's Hour.

Maurice, who was 53, died from a heart attack during emergency surgery in a Miami hospital on 12 January.

Maurice Gibb
Maurice "wouldn't want his brothers to stop working"

An autopsy report showed he had a congenital condition that caused his small intestine to twist, cutting off the blood supply.

"One just has to sit down and think about it all the time and go crazy, or throw yourself back into work again and that was what I had to do," he told the programme.

Robin and his surviving brother, Barry, revealed on Wednesday that the death of Maurice meant the end of the Bee Gees as a group.

The pair vowed to continue working together, but said they would not use the group's name out of respect for their brother.

'Chemistry'

The Bee Gees sold more than 110 million records worldwide and penned hit songs for stars like Diana Ross, Celine Dion and Dionne Warwick.

They also recorded solo material, something Robin was doing at the time of Maurice's death.

His single Please was released in Britain on Monday.

But he told the BBC that solo work had never brought as much joy as working with his brothers.

"There is a chemistry that we had together that was just magical," he said.

Maurice Gibb

Key Stories

IN PICTURES

TALKING POINT

ON TOP OF THE POPS
See also:

22 Jan 03 | Entertainment
17 Jan 03 | Entertainment
Internet links:


The BBC is not responsible for the content of external internet sites

Links to more Entertainment stories are at the foot of the page.


 E-mail this story to a friend

Links to more Entertainment stories

© BBC ^^ Back to top

News Front Page | Africa | Americas | Asia-Pacific | Europe | Middle East |
South Asia | UK | Business | Entertainment | Science/Nature |
Technology | Health | Talking Point | Country Profiles | In Depth |
Programmes