BBC NEWS Americas Africa Europe Middle East South Asia Asia Pacific
BBCi NEWS   SPORT   WEATHER   WORLD SERVICE   A-Z INDEX     

BBC News World Edition
    You are in: Entertainment  
News Front Page
Africa
Americas
Asia-Pacific
Europe
Middle East
South Asia
UK
Business
Entertainment
Science/Nature
Technology
Health
-------------
Talking Point
-------------
Country Profiles
In Depth
-------------
Programmes
-------------
BBC Sport
BBC Weather
SERVICES
-------------
EDITIONS
 Tuesday, 7 January, 2003, 13:18 GMT
Reeve to make Smallville debut
Christopher Reeve in 1996
The Superman actor has been paralysed since 1995
Superman star Christopher Reeve is to make a guest appearance in US TV hit Smallville next month, giving advice to a young Clark Kent.

Reeve, who made his name as the mild-mannered reporter with superhero powers in the 1978 film and two sequels, was paralysed from the neck down in a 1995 horse-riding accident.

Smallville, now in its second series, is also about Superman and stars Tom Welling as a teenage Kent, coming to terms with his unusual powers and strength.

Smallville
Smallville shows in the UK on Channel 4
The youngster is seen coping with the kind of adolescent problems that plague most teenagers - difficulties at school, girlfriend issues and dealing with his over-attentive parents.

The show is expected to air during the "sweeps" ratings period in February - when audiences nationwide are measured to determine future advertising rates.

As part of the deal for him to guest star in Smallville, the WB Network, which broadcasts the series, will run a public service announcement at the end of the episode for the Christopher Reeve Paralysis Foundation.

Reeve has spent about 280,000 a year in medical bills and has been campaigning for medical research into the condition.

Originally, he was determined to be able to walk by his 50th birthday, but that deadline passed in September 2002.

He can now move his fingers and toes again, and last month doctors at Washington University School of Medicine in St Louis, US, discovered his brain has maintained a near-normal ability to detect feeling and movement.

This suggests that Reeve - and maybe others who have suffered spinal injury - may still be ready to pick up where they left off, should a treatment be found.

See also:

10 Dec 02 | Health
17 Oct 01 | Entertainment
24 Feb 02 | Health
01 Mar 02 | Newsmakers
23 Jan 00 | Entertainment
30 May 01 | Health
Internet links:


The BBC is not responsible for the content of external internet sites

Links to more Entertainment stories are at the foot of the page.


 E-mail this story to a friend

Links to more Entertainment stories

© BBC ^^ Back to top

News Front Page | Africa | Americas | Asia-Pacific | Europe | Middle East |
South Asia | UK | Business | Entertainment | Science/Nature |
Technology | Health | Talking Point | Country Profiles | In Depth |
Programmes