BBC NEWS Americas Africa Europe Middle East South Asia Asia Pacific
BBCi NEWS   SPORT   WEATHER   WORLD SERVICE   A-Z INDEX     

BBC News World Edition
    You are in: Entertainment  
News Front Page
Africa
Americas
Asia-Pacific
Europe
Middle East
South Asia
UK
Business
Entertainment
Science/Nature
Technology
Health
-------------
Talking Point
-------------
Country Profiles
In Depth
-------------
Programmes
-------------
BBC Sport
BBC Weather
SERVICES
-------------
EDITIONS
 Friday, 3 January, 2003, 11:58 GMT
Star Trek flies on
The crew from Star Trek: Nemesis
The crew grapple with issues facing contemporary society

The tenth Star Trek movie, Nemesis, will still attract the fans, but it is time for the series to end?

The action begins when the starship Enterprise is diverted on its way to a celebration to meet the new leader of the Romulans, who has signalled that he is interested in a parley with the empire's old enemy, the Federation.

The new praetor of the militaristic empire, Shinzon (Tom Hardy, of Band of Brothers and Black Hawk Down), however, turns out to be the last person they were expecting.

Cast and crew are hinting broadly that Nemesis may be the last Next Generation film, though actor Patrick Stewart refused to commit one way or another in an interview with the BBC's Tom Brook.

Star Trek: Nemesis
Some of the scenes border on the maudlin
If so, it is a fitting send-off to probably the best of the five different Star Trek crews to have appeared on the small scene since Captain Kirk's premiere in 1966.

As with the original 1960s TV series, the new film grapples with issues confronting contemporary society, searching for a humane perspective on difficult questions.

Where subjects in the 1960s included racism, today it is bio-technology.

More subtly, it also covers the danger of losing track of what happens to abandoned weapons programmes, a timely theme as the Reagan-era Star Wars missile defence system roars back to life under George W Bush.

The filmmakers handle their discussion of bio-technology much more thoughtfully and successfully than, for example, the latest James Bond outing does.

Climactic

The film allows for two parallel discussions on how cloning affects the nature of identity without sacrificing dramatic tension.

This is a tribute both to the script and to the talents of Stewart as Captain Picard and Hardy as Shinzon.

In true Star Trek fashion, the Enterprise crew would rather talk than fight, but that does not - luckily for action fans - avert a climactic final space battle.

This is one of the few moments where the film's special effects rise above the ordinary.

The screenplay - co-written by Brent Spiner, who plays Data - is stronger when dealing with serious themes than when going for laughs, though a few jokes do hit the mark.

It is weakest in its final scenes, which border on the maudlin.

Overall, however, Nemesis compares well to other Star Trek films. Recommended.


Talking PointFORUM
Send your questions to Star Trek's Captain Jean-Luc PicardBeam me up
Star Trek actor Patrick Stewart quizzed
See also:

03 Jan 03 | Entertainment
26 Sep 02 | Entertainment
Internet links:


The BBC is not responsible for the content of external internet sites

Links to more Entertainment stories are at the foot of the page.


 E-mail this story to a friend

Links to more Entertainment stories

© BBC ^^ Back to top

News Front Page | Africa | Americas | Asia-Pacific | Europe | Middle East |
South Asia | UK | Business | Entertainment | Science/Nature |
Technology | Health | Talking Point | Country Profiles | In Depth |
Programmes