BBC NEWS Americas Africa Europe Middle East South Asia Asia Pacific
BBCi NEWS   SPORT   WEATHER   WORLD SERVICE   A-Z INDEX     

BBC News World Edition
 You are in: Entertainment  
News Front Page
Africa
Americas
Asia-Pacific
Europe
Middle East
South Asia
UK
Business
Entertainment
Science/Nature
Technology
Health
-------------
Talking Point
-------------
Country Profiles
In Depth
-------------
Programmes
-------------
BBC Sport
BBC Weather
SERVICES
-------------
EDITIONS
Friday, 6 December, 2002, 18:52 GMT
Disney's Treasure Planet flops
Treasure Planet cost over $140m
The film is based on Robert Louis Stevenson's Treasure Island
Disney's latest film, Treasure Planet, has become a box-office disaster in the US.

The film, an updated version of Robert Louis Stevenson's Treasure Island, cost over $140 m (94m) but grossed only $16.5m (11m) in the US and Canada over the Thanksgiving weekend.

The film was such a gamble for the famous studio that Disney's animation unit chief, Thomas Shumacher, is reported to be thinking about leaving the division because of its failure.

The animation unit, which has been producing cartoon films since 1937's Snow White And The Seven Dwarfs, has been one of the company's most successful departments in the past.

Treasure Planet's failure may also put pressure on Disney to make more projects with Pixar, the computer animation firm behind hit films like Toy Story and Monsters Inc.

Treasure Planet
The film has damaged Disney's expected profits
But Pixar, which splits production costs 50-50 with Disney, wants to end the current contract and only pay the media giant for distribution in the future.

"It puts a lot of pressure on them. They rolled the dice on a $140 million picture," said lawyer Nancy Newhouse Porter, who deals with the animation industry.

The bad returns for Treasure Planet have forced Disney to revise its expected profits for this year's final quarter.

It now expects to make $74m profit before tax for the quarter.

This is a 14% drop compared to last year's final quarter, which was itself only two per cent down compared to the year before.

Some of the failure has been blamed on the fact the company was trying to pitch the film to the notoriously fickle teenage boys' market.

Analysts say Disney is realising it can no longer make animated films that cost so much.

The recent hit Lilo & Stitch cost $80m in comparison.

The animation department is still one of the company's biggest, employing over 1200 people - but this is half the number working for at the time of its huge money-spinner The Lion King in 1994.

See also:

06 Nov 02 | Entertainment
21 Nov 02 | England
15 Nov 02 | Entertainment
07 Nov 02 | Business
05 Nov 02 | Business
Internet links:


The BBC is not responsible for the content of external internet sites

Links to more Entertainment stories are at the foot of the page.


E-mail this story to a friend

Links to more Entertainment stories

© BBC ^^ Back to top

News Front Page | Africa | Americas | Asia-Pacific | Europe | Middle East |
South Asia | UK | Business | Entertainment | Science/Nature |
Technology | Health | Talking Point | Country Profiles | In Depth |
Programmes