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Tuesday, 3 December, 2002, 10:09 GMT
Redford attacks Bush over fossil fuels
Robert Redford
Redford is not afraid to speak out against government
Actor and director Robert Redford has accused US President George Bush of a "lack of leadership" for failing to convince America to cut down its use of fossil fuels.

In an article in the Los Angeles Times he wrote that the Bush administration had not done enough to change people's dependence on fossil fuels.

Redford, an ardent environmental campaigner, said that the nation's use of gas and oil was at the centre of political trouble abroad and heavy pollution at home.

"Prolonging our dependence on fossil fuels would guarantee homeland insecurity," he wrote

"If you are worried about getting oil from an unstable Persian Gulf, consider the alternatives: Indonesia, Nigeria, Uzbekistan."

Redford, 65, advocates solar power as an alternative to fossil fuels but he is disappointed with the take up, quoting just 2% of power being generated in the US by wind or solar.

George Bush
This is not the first time Redford has attacked Mr Bush's policies
He also praised San Francisco's $100m (69m) bond initiative, passed last year by voters to pay for solar panels, wind power and energy efficiency for public buildings as an example of the way forward to create a pollution-free United States.

Energy dollars

The Oscar-winner also called upon to the automotive industry, urging it to use existing technology to increase fuel economy to 40 miles per gallon.

"Phasing in that standard by 2012 would save 15 times more oil than Alaska's Arctic National Wildlife Refuge is likely to produce over 50 years," he wrote.

He also sees energy efficiency as a way of "keeping energy dollars in the American economy, reduce air pollution and create jobs at home".

The Kid star has a history of accusing Bush of failing in his duties to the environment, saying he "doesn't have a clue" in an interview ahead of last year's global climate conference in Germany.

He urged nations to put pressure on Mr Bush to cut its emissions, calling the US the world's biggest polluter.

See also:

09 Jul 01 | Entertainment
01 Nov 02 | South Asia
21 Jan 02 | Entertainment
16 Mar 01 | Science/Nature
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