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Friday, 15 November, 2002, 12:13 GMT
'Legal row' over Bill Wyman's name
Bill Wyman and his wife Suzanne Accosta
Bill Wyman left the Rolling Stones in 1992
A US journalist has reportedly been contacted by lawyers representing a former Rolling Stones member Bill Wyman over use of his name, which happens to be the same as the guitarist.

Journalist Bill Wyman, a staff writer for the Atlanta Journal-Constitution, has written an article about receiving the letter, a copy of which is included on the newspaper's website.

He wrote that the letter, from Howard Siegel, of New York-based Pryor Cashman Sherman & Flynn, threatened "legal action" over use of his name.

"Mr Siegel magnanimously allowed I could continue to use my own name if I could prove that I had come by it legally, and if I added a disclaimer to everything I wrote in the future, 'clearly indicating that [you are] not the same Bill Wyman who was a member of the Rolling Stones'," he added.

Mick Jagger, Keith Richards and Ronnie Wood
Bill Wyman's former Stones' colleagues are still going strong
The journalist said that having been a pop music writer for more than 20 years, he had worked effectively with Rolling Stones publicists in the past with no problems.

"I remember scarfing up some food next to Keith Richards backstage at a shed in the middle of Wisconsin with no legal repercussions," he said.

The journalist added that the former Stone was actually born William George Perks, and changed his name to Bill Wyman by deed poll in 1964, according to a book about him called Stone Alone.

"Me, I was born Jan 11, 1961. What I need now is a lawyer to ask Mr. Siegel that his client stop using a name I have claim to by several years," he said.

Pryor Cashman Sherman & Flynn were unavailable for comment.

Mick Jagger
Jagger: Hit back at newspaper claims
Another Rolling Stone also hit headlines when lead singer Mick Jagger, 59, issued a statement publicly denying a 17-year-old Swedish model's claims that he was pestering her.

He is said to feel that the allegations risked hurting his family and friends.

The Sun reported that Caroline Winberg had been rung up by the rocker and invited to "join him on his current world tour", and included comments from her parents.

'Ridiculous'

But Jagger said on Friday: "This is completely untrue and a misrepresentation of the facts by Miss Winberg and her family.

"We have spoken on the telephone several times.

"She said she was coming to the States in the autumn and asked if I could get her and her friends some tickets for a concert which I said I would try to help with.

"To suggest that I have pestered her in any way is absolutely ridiculous."

See also:

24 Oct 01 | Entertainment
10 Nov 01 | Newsmakers
12 Oct 02 | Entertainment
09 Jun 99 | Entertainment
09 May 01 | Entertainment
25 May 99 | Entertainment
09 Nov 98 | Entertainment
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