BBC NEWS Americas Africa Europe Middle East South Asia Asia Pacific
BBCi NEWS   SPORT   WEATHER   WORLD SERVICE   A-Z INDEX     

BBC News World Edition
 You are in: Entertainment  
News Front Page
Africa
Americas
Asia-Pacific
Europe
Middle East
South Asia
UK
Business
Entertainment
Science/Nature
Technology
Health
-------------
Talking Point
-------------
Country Profiles
In Depth
-------------
Programmes
-------------
BBC Sport
BBC Weather
SERVICES
-------------
EDITIONS
Sunday, 10 November, 2002, 19:58 GMT
In brief: Crossroads unveils new line-up
Former Birds of a Feather star Linda Robson is joining Crossroads as part of its new line-up.

Kate O'Mara, who starred in 70s TV series Triangle, will also join the revamped ITV1 daytime soap when it returns in the New Year.

Robson plays a jailbird mother of three, while O'Mara will play a cigar-smoking magistrate.

Other guest stars joining Crossroads in the near future include Jane Asher and Emma Noble.


West End hit holding open auditions

Producers of West End music Mamma Mia are to hold Popstars-style auditions to find a new cast for the Abba-inspired show.

An open audition will be held at 9am on Monday at the Prince Edward Theatre, where the musical has been running for the past three years.

Producers said they will be able to see only 250 hopefuls, who will be expected to sing an upbeat pop song.

Auditions have already been held elsewhere in the country.


EastEnders stars remake Thriller video

Stars of BBC One soap EastEnders have recorded a spoof version of Michael Jackson's Thriller video for the annual Children In Need broadcast.

About a dozen of the cast took part, including Hannah Waterman, who plays Laura Beale, and Nicholas R Bailey, who plays Dr Trueman.

"They do the whole dance routine made famous in the original video," said a BBC spokesman.

The Children in Need event takes place next Friday evening on BBC One.

Allen on psychiatrist's couch

Film-maker Woody Allen has faced probing questions from a psychiatrist during a lecture on his films in front of an 800-strong audience in New York.

In a scene straight from one of his movies, the director-actor famed for his neurotic characters fended off a stream of suggestions on how psychoanalysis had affected his life and work.

"There is no profound significance to any of the dream sequences in my movies," he said. "I made it all up."

Describing his 40 years of therapy, Allen, 66, told Dr Gail Saltz: "It got me through periods of my life when I was very unhappy and was insecure."

Links to more Entertainment stories are at the foot of the page.


E-mail this story to a friend

Links to more Entertainment stories

© BBC ^^ Back to top

News Front Page | Africa | Americas | Asia-Pacific | Europe | Middle East |
South Asia | UK | Business | Entertainment | Science/Nature |
Technology | Health | Talking Point | Country Profiles | In Depth |
Programmes