BBC NEWS Americas Africa Europe Middle East South Asia Asia Pacific
BBCi NEWS   SPORT   WEATHER   WORLD SERVICE   A-Z INDEX     

BBC News World Edition
 You are in: Entertainment  
News Front Page
Africa
Americas
Asia-Pacific
Europe
Middle East
South Asia
UK
Business
Entertainment
Science/Nature
Technology
Health
-------------
Talking Point
-------------
Country Profiles
In Depth
-------------
Programmes
-------------
BBC Sport
BBC Weather
SERVICES
-------------
EDITIONS
Thursday, 31 October, 2002, 21:10 GMT
Indian composer sues rapper Dr Dre
Dr Dre
Dr Dre's record label released Addictive
An Indian composer is suing rapper Dr Dre claiming a record produced on his label for Truth Hurts borrowed heavily from a 20-year-old Hindi song.

Songwriter Bappi Lahiri filed the suit in the US District Court in Los Angeles the US, saying hit single Addictive was the product of "cultural imperialism" that did not credit Third World artists.

Dr Dre, real name Andre Young, is named in the lawsuit alongside Aftermath Records, its parent company Interscope Records, Universal Music and Vivendi Universal.

Lahiri wants to halt further sales of the album Truthfully Yours from female artist Truth Hurts.

Dr Dre's lawyer, Howard King, dismissed the lawsuit as Lahiri trying to cash in on the rapper's fame.

"There's no reason for him to be a defendant in this lawsuit, except that somebody's taking advantage of his name," Mr King said.

Superimposed

"He didn't write or perform on the record. It happens to have been released on a label he's part owner of."

Lahiri is accusing the producers of Addictive of copying four minutes of a song performed by Indian artist Lata Mangeshkar called Thoda Resham Lagta Hai.

"They literally superimposed their own drum track and lyrics over the beat," said Lahiri's lawyer Anthony Kornarens.

"It's our opinion that the label simply took it for granted that Hindi music was something they didn't need to pay for, that it could be used simply at will," Kornarens said.

A $500m (320m) lawsuit has already been filed in a federal court against the same companies by Bombay-based film and music company Saregama India, which produced the original recording of Lahiri's song.

See also:

10 Apr 02 | Entertainment
26 Apr 02 | Entertainment
31 Mar 02 | Entertainment
03 Jan 01 | Entertainment
27 Apr 00 | Entertainment
Internet links:


The BBC is not responsible for the content of external internet sites

Links to more Entertainment stories are at the foot of the page.


 E-mail this story to a friend

Links to more Entertainment stories

© BBC ^^ Back to top

News Front Page | Africa | Americas | Asia-Pacific | Europe | Middle East |
South Asia | UK | Business | Entertainment | Science/Nature |
Technology | Health | Talking Point | Country Profiles | In Depth |
Programmes