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Wednesday, 30 October, 2002, 10:02 GMT
Bjork's mother ends hunger strike
Hildur Runa Hauksdottir
Ms Hauksdottir says her point has been made
The mother of pop star Bjork has ended a hunger strike she had staged to protest against plans for a power plant in the Icelandic wilderness.

Hildur Runa Hauksdottir revealed on Tuesday that she began eating again on Sunday night at the start of her fourth week of fasting.

Ms Hauksdottir, 56, lost more than 14lbs (6kg) during her campaign against plans by a US company to build a $3bn (1.93bn) aluminium smelter and hydroelectric plant in Iceland's highlands.

Throughout her hunger strike, which began on 7 October, she consumed only Icelandic herbal tea and homeopathic tonics.

Bjork
Bjork flew to see her mother on Sunday
Ms Hauksdottir said she ended the protest because she was satisfied that her message was having a global impact.

As the mother of Iceland's most famous person, her action generated publicity around the world.

She said her decision to quit had nothing to do with Bjork's arrival in Iceland on Sunday - the singer's first visit since she gave birth to her daughter earlier this month.


Bjork would have supported me if I had decided to continue, as well I might

Hildur Runa Hauksdottir
"She was pleased to hear that I had decided to stop the strike, of course," said Ms Hauksdottir.

"Yet she would have supported me if I had decided to continue, as well I might."

Support

She added: "Americans, Europeans, people in the Far East, have all contacted me asking how they can help, how they can stop this.

"I thank them for their support and I urge them to keep track by reading the campaign website. But a lot more work needs to be done - time is running out."

Vatnajokull in 1998
Vatnajokull is considered a wildlife haven
US-based company Alcoa and the Icelandic government have already started work building access roads and tunnels for the scheme above Vatnajokull glacier.

The state-owned power company plans to build 11 dams to create a 22-square mile reservoir, which will provide the hydroelectric power for an Alcoa-owned smelter at Reydarfjordur on the coast.

The area is home to reindeer, rare geese and plants, as well as glacial rivers, snow-covered volcanoes and deep, basalt canyons. It was the setting for Bjork's video for the 1997 single, Joga.

Environmentalists say the project will cause massive erosion and pollute rivers and deltas with glacial mud.

See also:

17 Oct 02 | Entertainment
30 May 02 | Country profiles
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14 Aug 00 | Scotland
28 Oct 02 | Entertainment
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