BBC NEWS Americas Africa Europe Middle East South Asia Asia Pacific
BBCi NEWS   SPORT   WEATHER   WORLD SERVICE   A-Z INDEX     

BBC News World Edition
 You are in: Entertainment  
News Front Page
Africa
Americas
Asia-Pacific
Europe
Middle East
South Asia
UK
Business
Entertainment
Science/Nature
Technology
Health
-------------
Talking Point
-------------
Country Profiles
In Depth
-------------
Programmes
-------------
BBC Sport
BBC Weather
SERVICES
-------------
EDITIONS
Friday, 11 October, 2002, 10:54 GMT 11:54 UK
Giuliani defends Sopranos
The Sopranos
Columbus Day parade organisers have criticised The Sopranos
New York's former mayor Rudolph Giuliani has said that cast members of The Sopranos should be allowed to march in the city's Columbus Day parade.

His comments came after current Mayor Michael Bloomberg, was criticised by parade organisers for inviting cast members to take part in the annual celebration of Italian pride.

Actor Dominic Chianese, who plays Tony Soprano's Uncle Junior on the hit US drama series, and Lorraine Bracco, who plays psychiatrist Jennifer Melfi have been asked to join the procession.

However, members of the Columbus Citizens Foundation, which plans the event, dislike the show and have said it portrays a negative cariacature of Italian-American life.

Stereotypes

They have previously turned down requests for cast members to participate.

"I think we all get beyond it when we relax more about it - it's just a show," said Mr Giuliani, who told reporters that he was a fan of the programme.

Mr Bloomberg said he did not specifically invite Chianese and Bracco to join the parade because of their involvement with the show.

"I didn't invite them as members of The Sopranos, I didn't invite any other member of The Sopranos cast," he said.

"These are two nice people who have gone out of their way to help the city."
Rudolph Giuliani
Giuliani is a big fan of the show

"I apologise if anybody's offended. If you are offended, don't wave back when they wave to you."

Larry Auriana, president of the Columbus Citizens Foundation, said the show was promoting negative stereotypes, and showed Italian-Americans as "uneducated, low-life brutes".

Plaudits

The show has been in trouble before for its portrayal of Italian-American life.

The Italian-American Defense Association took legal action against the show's producers Time Warner earlier this year, under the "individual dignity" clause of the Illinois state constitution.

They were seeking a declaration from a jury that the show offends the dignity of Italian-Americans. The case was dismissed, but they are currently seeking a new hearing.

The show has won continuing plaudits and high ratings for its slick domestic twist on a familiar theme.

It has made a star out of James Gandolfini, who plays a mob boss who is seeing a psychiatrist, as well as other cast members playing in the dysfunctional family.

See also:

28 Aug 02 | Entertainment
16 Jul 02 | Entertainment
17 May 02 | Entertainment
20 Sep 01 | Entertainment
29 Aug 01 | Entertainment
29 Aug 01 | Entertainment
23 Jan 02 | Entertainment
20 May 00 | Americas
Internet links:


The BBC is not responsible for the content of external internet sites

Links to more Entertainment stories are at the foot of the page.


E-mail this story to a friend

Links to more Entertainment stories

© BBC ^^ Back to top

News Front Page | Africa | Americas | Asia-Pacific | Europe | Middle East |
South Asia | UK | Business | Entertainment | Science/Nature |
Technology | Health | Talking Point | Country Profiles | In Depth |
Programmes