BBC NEWS Americas Africa Europe Middle East South Asia Asia Pacific
BBCi NEWS   SPORT   WEATHER   WORLD SERVICE   A-Z INDEX     

BBC News World Edition
 You are in: Entertainment  
News Front Page
Africa
Americas
Asia-Pacific
Europe
Middle East
South Asia
UK
Business
Entertainment
Science/Nature
Technology
Health
-------------
Talking Point
-------------
Country Profiles
In Depth
-------------
Programmes
-------------
BBC Sport
BBC Weather
SERVICES
-------------
EDITIONS
Friday, 11 October, 2002, 11:22 GMT 12:22 UK
Electronic guides to 'revolutionise' radio
Digital radio
The information will appear on digital radio screens
Radio listeners are to be offered a completely new way of selecting programmes.

Capital Radio, Chrysalis Radio and UBC Media Group are set to launch the world's first electronic programme guide on Monday.

It can be used free of charge by owners of digital radio sets, which are equipped with small screens traditionally providing basic information such as the name of a song currently playing.

The electronic programme guide will give consumers a rich experience which will completely transform radio listening

Simon Cole, UBC Media chief executive

But the new guide will allow the screens to reveal much more.

Listeners will be able to browse programming schedules, choose which programmes to listen to or record and read extra information about artists and concerts.

UBC spent 18 months developing the guide. Other broadcasters who want their programme details listed will have to buy a licence from UBC.

The service has a potential audience of 22.5 million, which includes the current number of people in the UK with access to digital radio and those who intend to get it.

UBC Media chief executive Simon Cole said the new programme will provide listeners with "a rich experience which will completely transform radio listening".

Better sound

Digital radio provides improved sound quality and a more extensive selection of programmes.

It is far easier to use than traditional radio, does not suffer from interference and as you travel around in a car there is no need to keep retuning.

Pure Evoke 1 digital radio
The screen of the Evoke radio is too small for the new guide
It is considered the future of radio in the UK because the government plans to switch off the current system.

But the high price of digital sets has slowed the technology's spread.

Last year saw high street prices range from around 349 to 1200 for in-car and 450 to 2300 for hi-fi systems.

The launch earlier this year of a 99 model has seen it grow. There are now 28,000 back orders for the Evoke set.

The Evoke will not, however, be able to use the new electronic programme guide because its screen is too small.


BBC Three debut

New radio

Other new TV

Background

YOUR VIEWS

WEBSITES
See also:

01 May 02 | Entertainment
Internet links:


The BBC is not responsible for the content of external internet sites

Links to more Entertainment stories are at the foot of the page.


E-mail this story to a friend

Links to more Entertainment stories

© BBC ^^ Back to top

News Front Page | Africa | Americas | Asia-Pacific | Europe | Middle East |
South Asia | UK | Business | Entertainment | Science/Nature |
Technology | Health | Talking Point | Country Profiles | In Depth |
Programmes