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Tuesday, 8 October, 2002, 13:35 GMT 14:35 UK
Tate unveils huge sculpture
Anish Kapoor by his new sculpture
Anish Kapoor hopes to create the wow factor
One of the world's biggest indoors sculptures has gone on display at London's Tate Modern.

The work, which measures almost 150 metres in length and is 10 storeys high, spans the entire entrance of the art gallery.

Turner Prize winner Anish Kapoor hopes that his sculpture, Marsyas, will have the "wow factor".


It's a big thing because it needs to be a big thing

Artist Anish Kapoor

It has taken 40 people about six weeks to build the sculpture for the gallery's Turbine Hall.

The sculpture, which is 23 metres wide and 35 metres high, consists of three steel rings, connected by a specially-made PVC membrane.

Difficult space

Two rings are positioned vertically, at each end of the space, while the third is suspended above the bridge spanning the centre of the Tate.

The design is the third commission for the space as part of The Unilever Series.

Kapoor, who is known for his abstract designs, has been planning the work of art for about nine months.

Anish Kapoor
The space demanded something big, says Kapoor
It remains to be seen whether he has broken the record for the biggest sculpture indoors.

But he said he had just done what the "notoriously difficult space" had demanded.

"It's a big thing because it needs to be a big thing. One hopes that it's a deep thing."

He said he hoped people's reaction would be: "You walk in and you probably can't help but go: `Wow what's that?"'

The design aims to humanise the industrial feel of the former power station.

It is impossible to see the entire sculpture from any one position. It was not a sculpture to walk through but not around, he said.

The artist's previous works have ranged from powdered pigment sculptures to gigantic installations both in and outdoors.

The current sculpture's title refers to Marsyas, the satyr in Greek mythology, who was flayed alive by the god Apollo.

See also:

28 Jul 99 | Entertainment
26 Feb 01 | Entertainment
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