BBC NEWS Americas Africa Europe Middle East South Asia Asia Pacific
BBCi NEWS   SPORT   WEATHER   WORLD SERVICE   A-Z INDEX     

BBC News World Edition
 You are in: Entertainment  
News Front Page
Africa
Americas
Asia-Pacific
Europe
Middle East
South Asia
UK
Business
Entertainment
Science/Nature
Technology
Health
-------------
Talking Point
-------------
Country Profiles
In Depth
-------------
Programmes
-------------
BBC Sport
BBC Weather
SERVICES
-------------
EDITIONS
Thursday, 3 October, 2002, 10:46 GMT 11:46 UK
Barbican plans Bard without RSC
The Barbican Theatre
The Barbican was the RSC's London home for 20 years
The London theatre abandoned by the Royal Shakespeare Company has announced plans to continue staging the Bard's plays without them.

The Barbican Centre is to fill the void left by the RSC's move by putting on plays itself.

Nigel Hawthorne in an RSC production at the Barbican
Nigel Hawthorne starred as King Lear at the Barbican with the RSC
The theatre was designed for the RSC, and the company had its London base there for 20 years.

But the curtain came down on its era at the venue in May after a controversial decision by former artistic director Adrian Noble to take the RSC on a tour of London theatres.

They had staged six months of Shakespeare at the venue every year, for which the Barbican paid them 1m.

Some of that money will now go towards the Barbican's own productions, which will be staged on a show-by-show basis.


We want very much to continue to provide for the Shakespeare audience that has traditionally come here

Spokeswoman
The Barbican
"It's new and it's quite an unusual thing for the Barbican to do," a spokeswoman told BBC News Online.

"There is a huge audience, particularly a huge Barbican audience, for Shakespeare and other classic texts," she said.

"We want very much to continue to provide for the Shakespeare audience that has traditionally come here, and also to go on to looking for new audiences for Shakespeare."

A spokeswoman for the RSC said it was not a radical move and there was room for both.

"If it enriches London's arts scene, then it's fine with us. It's not a question of either or," she told BBC News Online.

Return

"We have plans to go back there quite regularly, with Shakespeare and other things."

The company's next visit to the Barbican will come in 2003 when they present a stage adaptation of Salman Rushdie's Midnight Children.

As well as two theatre spaces, the Barbican, which opened in 1982, also includes a concert hall, three cinemas and two art galleries.

It has just announced a 12m plan to renovate its entrances and foyers.

See also:

12 May 02 | Entertainment
15 Aug 02 | Entertainment
25 Jul 02 | Entertainment
01 Aug 02 | Entertainment
25 Jul 02 | Entertainment
15 May 02 | Entertainment
08 Mar 02 | Entertainment
Internet links:


The BBC is not responsible for the content of external internet sites

Links to more Entertainment stories are at the foot of the page.


E-mail this story to a friend

Links to more Entertainment stories

© BBC ^^ Back to top

News Front Page | Africa | Americas | Asia-Pacific | Europe | Middle East |
South Asia | UK | Business | Entertainment | Science/Nature |
Technology | Health | Talking Point | Country Profiles | In Depth |
Programmes