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Tuesday, 1 October, 2002, 09:03 GMT 10:03 UK
Orange to show on Channel 4
A Clockwork Orange
Malcolm McDowell stars in A Clockwork Orange
A Clockwork Orange, Stanley Kubrick's controversial film adaptation of Anthony Burgess' novel, is to be shown on British mainstream TV for the first time.

The film, which stars Malcolm McDowell, will be screened on Channel 4 on 13 October, with a documentary about the film's legacy showing the night before.

Originally released in UK cinemas in 1972, A Clockwork Orange is the story of teenage thug Alex, played by McDowell, who is subjected to extreme aversion therapy by the authorities after committing a string of violent acts.

Shot in housing estates in Thamesmead, south-east London, the film also features early appearances from John Savident, who now plays Fred Elliott in Coronation Street, and Warren Clarke, who stars as Andy Dalziel and BBC drama Dalziel and Pascoe.

It was well-received by critics at the time and was subsequently nominated for four Oscars, including Best Picture.
A Clockwork Orange
The film was withdrawn in the UK by Stanley Kubrick

Graphic

However the film's graphic scenes - it shows a gang rape to music from Rossini - were thought to have sparked copycat attacks in Britain and police at the time warned it was receiving a "demonic" level of attention.

Kubrick withdrew the film from distribution in the UK the following year - although it continued to be shown in other countries.

The eccentric director was also said to have received death threats against himself and his family following the film's release.

However, he continued to maintain that the film was warning people against committing acts of violence rather than encouraging them to do so.

Following Kubrick's death in 1999, distributors agreed the film could be screened again. It was re-released in cinemas the following year and is now available on VHS and DVD.

It has also been shown on satellite channels in the UK.

See also:

04 Jul 01 | Entertainment
17 Jun 01 | Entertainment
06 Dec 99 | Entertainment
12 May 00 | Entertainment
17 Mar 00 | UK
14 Mar 00 | Entertainment
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