BBC NEWS Americas Africa Europe Middle East South Asia Asia Pacific
BBCi NEWS   SPORT   WEATHER   WORLD SERVICE   A-Z INDEX     

BBC News World Edition
 You are in: Entertainment  
News Front Page
Africa
Americas
Asia-Pacific
Europe
Middle East
South Asia
UK
Business
Entertainment
Science/Nature
Technology
Health
-------------
Talking Point
-------------
Country Profiles
In Depth
-------------
Programmes
-------------
BBC Sport
BBC Weather
SERVICES
-------------
EDITIONS
Friday, 6 September, 2002, 08:32 GMT 09:32 UK
Short films spark US anger
Ernest Borgnine in Sean Penn's short film Peter Feldman
Sean Penn contributed a short film
A screening of 11 short films reflecting on the attacks on the United States last year from a global perspective has received a mixed reaction at the Venice Film Festival.

Some of the films, directed by luminaries such as the UK's Ken Loach, Bosnian film-maker Danis Tanovic and Hollywood actor/director Sean Penn, criticised America and its foreign policy.

Their approach angered some US audience members.


The balance I'd expect from these films is totally lacking

Taran Davies
Each of the films in the series, called 11'09"01 September 11, lasts 11 minutes and nine seconds and is shot on one frame.

Journalists and industry figures applauded many of the contributions.

But the short from Egyptian director Youssef Chahine also brought boos from the audience.

Blame

Chahine's film set out to explain that anger towards the US only increased violence in the Middle East.

His film showed a Palestinian suicide attack in Israel, laying part of the blame on Washington.

Ken Loach
Ken Loach's short film was applauded
"Israel fools everyone. Bush lets them decide who the terrorists are, but imagine your house or the olive trees your ancestors planted being bulldozed," says the father of the Palestinian who carried out the attack in the short.

Some Americans in the audience felt the film showed a one-sided view of world events.

'Too far'

"There is a strong anti-US current here," said Taran Davies, a New Yorker in Venice to show an independent film about Afghanistan in the wake of 11 September.

"People are going too far. The balance I'd expect from these films is totally lacking.

"They are criticising a lot of purported atrocities committed by the United States rather than the atrocities committed against the United States."

But the producer of the short films, Alain Brigand, said he had encouraged all the film-makers to exercise their freedom.

The shorts would not be shown in the US "while the American people are still mourning", he added.

The films show a range of perspectives.

In Amos Gitai's film a journalist is seen reporting live on a suicide attack in Tel Aviv but is told something more important is happening in New York.

Danis Tanovic's short depicted forgotten mourners of the massacre at Srebrenica.

'Suffered'

The mourners are seen remembering their dead and marching in solidarity with the United States.

A German film critic said the films showed there were poor countries who have suffered under the influence of the United States.

"They are saying: 'We have our own pain. We respect your pain but you have to look at us too'."


Latest news

Behind the scenes

WEBSITES
See also:

29 Aug 02 | September 11
06 Sep 02 | Middle East
Internet links:


The BBC is not responsible for the content of external internet sites

Links to more Entertainment stories are at the foot of the page.


E-mail this story to a friend

Links to more Entertainment stories

© BBC ^^ Back to top

News Front Page | Africa | Americas | Asia-Pacific | Europe | Middle East |
South Asia | UK | Business | Entertainment | Science/Nature |
Technology | Health | Talking Point | Country Profiles | In Depth |
Programmes