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Wednesday, 4 September, 2002, 13:15 GMT 14:15 UK
Clinton denies talk show plans
Bill Clinton
Clinton has received offers from TV networks
Former US president Bill Clinton has said he has no plans to start a new career as a talk show host, despite offers from American TV networks.

In an interview on the CNN show Larry King Live, Clinton said he would not be hosting a chat show in the near future, but did not rule it out completely.

Larry King
Clinton was a guest on Larry King Live
"Maybe some time later in my life I'd like to do it," said the 56-year-old. "It would be intriguing to me because I like to talk to people."

However, he added that he would have to give up too many of his current commitments to take on such a job.

"You have to be here every day, and a lot of the work I do requires me to travel," Clinton said.

"I really believe I should always spend more than half my time on public service, so I just don't see how I can do it."

According to reports, Clinton's representatives held talks last month with the US network CBS about developing a syndicated talk show to be hosted by the former president.

Those talks began following an attempt to secure a similar deal with the NBC network, which failed.

There was also speculation that Clinton was to be offered between $30-$50m a year to host a talk show, which would be the highest amount ever paid to a new TV presenter.

However, a spokesperson for Clinton said he was considering all offers of work and keeping his options open.

If Clinton were to front his own show, he would become the first former US leader to do so.

Former presidents are known for keeping a relatively low profile after their time in the Oval Office, many opting for philanthropic pursuits and select public appearances.

See also:

15 Jan 01 | Americas
21 May 01 | Americas
07 Feb 01 | Americas
15 Jan 01 | Business
15 Oct 02 | Americas
14 Dec 00 | UK
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