BBC NEWS Americas Africa Europe Middle East South Asia Asia Pacific
BBCi NEWS   SPORT   WEATHER   WORLD SERVICE   A-Z INDEX     

BBC News World Edition
 You are in: Entertainment  
News Front Page
Africa
Americas
Asia-Pacific
Europe
Middle East
South Asia
UK
Business
Entertainment
Science/Nature
Technology
Health
-------------
Talking Point
-------------
Country Profiles
In Depth
-------------
Programmes
-------------
BBC Sport
BBC Weather
SERVICES
-------------
EDITIONS
Friday, 23 August, 2002, 14:45 GMT 15:45 UK
TV world waits for Channel 4 boss
Mark Thompson
Mr Thompson is guiding Channel 4 through troubles
Channel 4 boss Mark Thompson is to give his views on the state of the television industry when he delivers the annual McTaggart lecture in Edinburgh on Friday.

The keynote speech at the Edinburgh Television Festival has been given by senior industry figures including BBC director general Greg Dyke and ITV boss David Liddiment in the past.

The event has occasionally been used as a forum to demand changes to the way the BBC operates.

Chris Evans
Chris Evans is also among the festival speakers
And it has been reported that Mr Thompson, the former BBC director of television, may explain why he has changed his stance on the corporation's youth television channel after he left.

He championed the proposed youth digital channel, BBC Three, while with the corporation - but his new channel has said the plan will damage commercial stations.

The speech is the main event at the TV industry's annual talking shop and often sparks wide debate.

Industry figures will also be interested to hear Mr Thompson's vision for the future of Channel 4.

The channel has recently gone through troubled times, registering its first loss in a decade and scaling back film-making arm FilmFour.

On-screen talent

The threat of more job losses still hangs over the channel as it goes through a period of transition.

The McTaggart speech, which traditionally opens the festival, was used by Dyke to announce he was controversially scrapping the Nine O'Clock News and moving the bulletin to 2200.

The festival sees hundreds of TV executives and screen stars gathering for a series of discussions and debates about trends in the industry.

Already on Friday, Ricky Gervais and Stephen Merchant, creators and stars of The Office, revealed their much-awaited second series is set to ruffle a lot more feathers than the first, with the introduction of new characters upon which manager David Brent practices his vulgarity.

Merchant and and Gervais showed a festival audience a clip from episode five of the new BBC Two comedy series, scheduled for September, in which all the staff of the Slough firm are taking part in Red Nose Day. One is dressed as Wonder Woman, another as Ali G.

Gervais told the festival audience that the second series would be "the same but different" because it was the chance to develop the characters and push things a bit further.

Among the other sessions this year will be an appearance by broadcaster Chris Evans - the presenter who turns TV producer for forthcoming Channel 4 and Channel 5 shows - who will be quizzed on his views about the TV industry.

Coverage of the 2002 Edinburgh Festival from BBC News Online

The buzz

In focus

Fringe diarists

REVIEWS

AROUND THE BBC

WEBSITES
See also:

10 Apr 02 | Entertainment
09 Jul 02 | Entertainment
13 Aug 02 | Entertainment
05 Aug 02 | Entertainment
01 Aug 02 | Entertainment
24 Aug 01 | Entertainment
30 Aug 01 | Entertainment
Internet links:


The BBC is not responsible for the content of external internet sites

Links to more Entertainment stories are at the foot of the page.


E-mail this story to a friend

Links to more Entertainment stories

© BBC ^^ Back to top

News Front Page | Africa | Americas | Asia-Pacific | Europe | Middle East |
South Asia | UK | Business | Entertainment | Science/Nature |
Technology | Health | Talking Point | Country Profiles | In Depth |
Programmes