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Monday, 19 August, 2002, 17:30 GMT 18:30 UK
Cult sound effects released on CD
BBC Radiophonic Workshop
The Radiophonic Workshop was created in 1958
Rare collections of sound effects and theme tunes created by the BBC's legendary Radiophonic Workshop are to be released on CD for the first time.

The two albums contain the sounds of champagne corks popping, doors squeaking and lampshades being stroked that were used in incidental music for radio and TV shows in the 1960s and 70s.

Doctor Who
The workshop created the Doctor Who theme tune
The original vinyl LPs are now highly sought after by collectors, and the Radiophonic Workshop has acquired cult status.

It is best-known for creating the eerie Doctor Who theme tune, but its compositions were also used in The Goon Show, Blake's Seven and The Hitch-Hiker's Guide to the Galaxy.

One album, BBC Radiophonic Music, was originally released in 1968 and includes sounds from household objects or atmospheric noise that was spliced together in the days before electronic equipment.

Among the tracks is a theme tune for BBC Radio Sheffield, which was made by banging pieces of cutlery together, inspired by the city's traditional position at the centre of steel production.

The Radiophonic Workshop
The albums will be released in the UK in October
The album also includes introductions to Woman's Hour and Tomorrow's World, and the theme for a farming programme on BBC Norwich, which was later adapted for the closing credits of John Craven's Newsround.

Renowned Radiophonic composer Delia Derbyshire created the tune of Oranges and Lemons using the notes of the Greenwich Time Signal, and struck a green aluminium lampshade for a documentary about nomadic tribes in the Sahara.

The other album, The Radiophonic Workshop, first went on sale in 1975 and incorporated the new synthesiser technology.

Unlike the other release, all but three of the tracks were recorded specifically for the album.

The Radiophonic Workshop was founded in 1958, and continued working for all kinds of BBC programmes until it was disbanded in 1996.

The two albums will be released in the UK on 7 October.

See also:

14 Jun 01 | UK
28 Apr 00 | Entertainment
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