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Friday, 12 July, 2002, 15:32 GMT 16:32 UK
Favourite Scooby-Doo moments
Matthew Lillard as Shaggy with a CGI Scooby in the film version
Shaggy and Scooby were both cowards in the show
Scooby-Doo has now been released as a live action feature film but many of us will have fond memories of the cartoon that spawned the movie.

The plots became increasingly familiar over the years but the introduction of Scrappy Doo was met with resistance by some traditional fans.

Most people could relate to one of the four main characters - clean-cut Fred, glamourous Daphne, swotty Velma and slacker Shaggy.

But what are your favourite memories?

This debate is now closed. Please read below for a selection of your comments.

Scooby-Doo was the death of cartoons. With this programme it became clear that a cartoon series did not need to have stories or decent art but could rely on catch phrases used mindlessly. I think it opened the door for such drivel as My Little Pony, Care Bears and Hong Kong Phooey.

What is needed is either good stories and characters eg. The Simpsons' mindless violence eg. Tom and Jerry or a combination of the two eg. Bugs Bunny, Duckman.
Julian Ziegler, UK

I was always promised a Scooby Snack if I tidied my room...
Tyger, Holland


My favourite cartoon of all time. Loved every episode. Until they introduced Scrappy Doo that is

Jon, UK
During the early eighties Scooby-Doo was shown on the BBC and I can remember my twin brother and myself hiding behind the sofa in some of the adventures. Classic cartoons that had us hooked for years, until the introduction of Scrappy-Doo when we just turned it off!
Andy Courtney, UK

Does anyone remember the episode where there was a real ghost? Scooby and Shaggy were convinced that it was a criminal and were therefore not scared. They hatch a plan to catch it and after they do they find out that it was a real ghost. A novel twist to the usual formula.
Paolo Sammut, UK

I hope the cinemas will be stocking Scooby snacks for all the punters this weekend!
John, London

My favourite cartoon of all time. Loved every episode. Until they introduced Scrappy Doo that is.
Jon, UK

I am French, I live in Paris and my husband is English. When he and I are walking together, he points at canine droppings (one every five metres or so) and says: "Look, it's a Scooby 'do'!" I will never understand the English sense of humour.
Sylvie, France


It was always the fairground owner though, you'd have thought they would have learned after a while!

Kyle, UK
I think that the animated Scooby-Doo series was excellent. It portrayed serious issues and events in a lighthearted, politically free manner. It encouraged and inspired morality and kindness. I think it enabled me to become what I am today - a heart surgeon.
Daran Joshi, UK

Everything about the original cartoon was fantastic. But Scrappy-Doo was a total disaster. Now they have made the movie - apparently it has "real" supernatural stuff instead of some bloke in a mask. Why do we feel the need to brutally destroy such classics? Leave them in the past.
Richard, England

I absolutely loved Scooby-Doo when I was little; always looked forward to watching it after school and I can't wait to see the film!
Rachel, London, England

Scooby-Doo was a massive part of my childhood, it's great to see him still keeping kids amused! It was always the fairground owner though, you'd have thought they would have learned after a while!
Kyle, UK


My Scooby annuals from 1982 to 1985 are treasured possessions and even now the mug that I use at work has Shaggy and Scooby on it!

Amanda, UK
Nothing in adult life is as comforting as sitting as a child in front of the TV in your pyjamas with a bowl of frosties (extra cold milk of course) watching Scooby-Doo.. If the movie evokes 10% of that feeling, I'll go several times!!
Simon, Brussels

My fondest memory was the episode with the robot ghoul at the fairground. When it runs past Shaggy and Scoob, Shaggy proclaims "Wow! Faster than a speeding bullet!" To which Scoob replies questioningly, "Superman?" Such class - far ahead of it's time! Oh and that song! Zoinks!!
Rik Sargent, England

I used to love Scoob and Shaggy. They were the greatest! Always getting into trouble and always looking for food. I hated Scrappy though, it broke up the cool double act with the slapstick comedy.
Jim, Sheffield

I would have got away with it if it wasn't for those pesky kids!
Gary McGowan, Northern Ireland

I loved it as a kid and still do! My Scooby annuals from 1982 to 1985 are treasured possessions and even now the mug that I use at work has Shaggy and Scooby on it! However, I'm a Scooby-Doo purist as the early stuff is the best - Scrappy-Doo was a bad idea...
Amanda, UK


It was rubbish, with a single story line that in itself was idiotic, boring and stupid characters, and poor animation

Pete, UK
I still love watching Scooby Doo at the age of 34, my son loves watching it and he has been to see the film, he thought it was fantastic, it's good clean fun where nobody gets hurt and there is no violence. My son's goldfish is called Scooby. All I can say is, "Bring it on Scooby Doo".
Elaine Robinson, UK

I always remember the special episodes, especially the one where Batman and Robin teamed up with the group to solve a mystery.
Jason Duffield, UK

The predictable format.

Firstly, Velma would lose glasses and get caught. Then the gang always more likely to find secret passage when not looking for it as opposed to looking for it. Thirdly, splitting up was always more effective than staying together. And last, Scooby 75% chance of doing task for one scooby snack, 100% for two.
DB5, UK

It is a "classic" cartoon series only in the sense of being old. It was rubbish, with a single story line that in itself was idiotic, boring and stupid characters, and poor animation. I thought so when I was a kid, and I still think so. The film doesn't look any better.
Pete, UK

The show went dramatically downhill with the introduction of the irritating Scrappy-Doo. Let's hope that the film makers aren't tempted to include Scobby's nephew in any film sequel.
Craig, England


The most irritating, annoying and pointless cartoon I can remember from childhood

Rodolphe, UK
My elder brother (aged 34) died two years ago and we both loved the Scooby-Doo (even when we were adults) and in memory of him and the good times we had together when we were young, instead of buying something sombre, I bought a wedgewood model of Shaggy and Scooby together - and everytime I catch sight of it it, instead of being sad, I laugh and remember the good times and the humour we both shared.
Sue, UK

The Original Scooby-Doo is probably still the best kids cartoon going. The introduction of Scrappy was a modernisation that spoilt it. I can't wait for the UK release of the film!
Alex, UK

Scooby-Doo was never the same again when they introduced Scrappy et al.
Howard, England

The most irritating, annoying and pointless cartoon I can remember from childhood. God save us from those voices!
Rodolphe, UK

Like the Simpsons, Scooby-Doo has adult overtones. What were Fred and Daphne doing when the ghosts were chasing around the other three? They'd invariably split up, with Velma, Scooby and Shaggy always running into the creep. The Scooby snacks that were taken was always suspect, which went hand-in-hand with their incurable munchies. Shaggy looks like the typical hippy stoner. The best episode ever has to be when the gang went to Camelot castle and the wizard hypnotised Scooby to become evil. Hilarious.
Adam, UK

All I can say is you haven't lived until you've made a two foot tall Scooby sandwhich - and then got sent to bed for wasting the contents of the fridge in doing so!!
Richard, UK

When I was a kid and had been misbehaving, the worst punishment my parents could dish out was to send me to my room when Scooby-Doo was about to come on TV. Now my four-year-old son is a Scooby fanatic. He's called Fred, and he thinks it's a really cool name because of Scooby Doo (although he was actually named after his great grandfather!)
Petra, UK


Here's a spooky fact for you all...the malevolent presence turned out to be the third person that Scooby and friends met in each and every episode!

Darren, Blackpool
I remember as a kid trying to make a Scooby sandwich which consisted of layer upon layer of bread and assorted fillings and then trying to squash it enough to fit in my mouth. But only Scooby and Shaggy could manage it and had the technique. Welcome back!
M Hetherington, Scotland

Scooby cartoons have never lost their appeal even after so long. I still cant work out who the suspect is!!
Shehbaz Afzal, England, London/Manchester

"Scooby be doobe doo, looking for you, Scooby-Doo, where are you (over heeere)". I'm 32 and feeling very nostalgic. Scooby-Doo and probably a lot of other Hanna Barbara cartoon shows was a major part of my childhood. I still remember watching it in on Nigerian TV in the 70s.
OKJ, Nigeria

My favourite memory of Scooby-Doo will be the day it's taken off the air forever. I can't fathom how this insipid cartoon is so popular with TV executives. It's not popular with this cartoon fan.
SA, NJ, USA

Da da da da da da, puppy power!! Here's a spooky fact for you all...the malevolent presence turned out to be the third person that Scooby and friends met in each and every episode!
Darren, Blackpool, England


Daphne...phwooooaar!

Stephen Maidment, UK
Though I don't remember the content of the episode, for some reason I do recall seeing the very first broadcast of the first episode of Scooby in the UK.

I would have been about six and my sister Amanda three years older and we went to our friends Colin and Ashley to watch it - 'cos they had a colour telly!

However, I do remember that immediately before, Blue Peter reviewed the film Waterloo which starred the just departed Rod Steiger.

A strange snapshot of childhood to retain I've always felt but one I never get bored of boring people.
Quentin, UK

Daphne...phwooooaar!
Stephen Maidment, UK

Can I burn Scrappy-Doo, can I, can I? I hate that little mutt - typical pandering of Hollywood producers to a "modern audience"....it'll never work, and it never did - a tried and tested formula is exactly that...why change it?
Andy Twiss, UK


Even as a kid I would discuss how ludicrous the show was with my brother but that never stopped us watching it. It was all part of its charm

Gary, UK
Scooby-Doo was superb. I always remember the "villain" would just happen to be someone you met during the cartoon. Normally a relative or friend of the person who actually hired the team.
Rob, England

My mother tells me, that on hearing the theme tune, I would bounce up and down in my high-chair. She wanted to rename our home "Scooby-Doo cottage". My father saw sense and refused.
Leigh Harries, UK

OK, so how come whenever there was a spooky mansion to investigate, Shaggy and Scooby checked out downstairs with Thelma, while Fred and Daphne headed up to the bedrooms? I reckon there was something going on! Of course I never realised this when I was six-years-old.
Neil Johnson, United Kingdom

I remember Scooby-Doo as the best kids show ever. However, did ANYBODY like Scrappy-Doo?? Everyone I know loathed him. Please, please, if Scooby-Doo 2 is made keep that "thing" off the screens. Puppy Power... my a**e!
Gareth Brace, UK

Loved it!! Of course only the early episodes - pre-Scrappy-Doo - will do!
Chris G, London, UK

Even as a kid I would discuss how ludicrous the show was with my brother but that never stopped us watching it. It was all part of its charm. Monsters and ghosts were interesting and cool and this was as safe a format for them as you could imagine.

But there was no way back for the show once they introduced Scrappy-Doo who was the essence of the crummy character introduced to boost ratings. Everyone I've ever talked to about the show hated him. Truly loathesome.
Gary , UK

Something that brings memories of my childhood to my mind. But I'd rather have seen some old episodes than the film. I know I'll be disappointed. In advance, Shaggy looks like someone irritating as a real human character.
Carlos, UK


The original 1969 Scooby is absolute class. Nobody cared that every single episode had an identical plot. Sadly the film is terrible!

Alan, UK
I'm aged 31-years and can remember coming home from school with haste slumping on the couch and watching Scooby-Doo, I couldn't wait to watch the next episode. It had everything I liked because it was a little scary, mysterious, full of adventure, funny and had a classic detective storyline. What more could a budding young schoolkid want? Shaggy also used to crease me up and still does with his hair standing on end with fright at the first sight of a monster!

Now some 25 years later I am still well into Scooby-Doo. I have all the recently released full-length Warner brothers Scooby-Doo videos i.e. Scooby Doo on Zombie Island, Scooby Doo & the Alien Invaders etc. These films are still as good as the original series used to be and I would commend them to anyone, good family viewing!
Peter Hawes, UK

The original 1969 Scooby is absolute class. Nobody cared that every single episode had an identical plot. Sadly the film is terrible!!
Alan, UK

I grew up with Scooby. It was the best show on TV. Then they ruined it by introducing that annoying Scrappy and other talking dogs. I'm glad the movie sticks to the original line-up, although it will never be as good as the toon.
Al, UK

You forgot to mention Wayne's World, where a number of alternative endings to the film are offered, including a "Scooby-Doo" ending.
Dunstan Vavasour, England

I used to try and make those huge sandwich towers as a kid.
Nick, UK


I could have got round to some work this afternoon if it wasn't for this pesky talking point

Craig, Scotland
One of my abiding Scooby-Do memories is from the Ted Heath era and the miners' strike. Many people will remember that we had quite regular power cuts - quite a number of which began cruelly half-way through episodes of Scooby-Doo.

Other than that, I was struck by the way Fred appeared to have one very large, very white tooth. I also used to wonder why he always sent Shaggy and Scooby off in one direction and took the girls with him. Of course, I'm a big boy now, so I understand these things... One more thing "I'd have gotten away with working this afternoon if it wasn't for this pesky nostalgia!"
Jon Sutcliffe, United Kingdom

I'm now 37. I recall my mother commenting that Shaggy "was a funny name!!" It was some years later I realised what she meant.
D Dixey, UK

I could have got round to some work this afternoon if it wasn't for this pesky talking point....
Craig, Scotland


I recently read an article where the creators of the series stated that the Scooby-Doo character was inspired by London-born Bob Hope

Mary Holland, USA
I seem to remember a cloud of smoke from their van as It pulled away - it came out of the windows, rather than the exhaust.
Ben Sales, UK

As a kid I only watched the cartoon becuase it was so BAD. I remember thinking, at the time when I was around 10-years-old, that the animation was very poor quality (the movements of the characters were not very intricate or fluid) and the plots were totally lame and cookie-cutter. But I watched the show for these very reasons.
Bucky Montano, USA

I grew up watching Scooby, waiting for dinner to be ready and fighting with my younger brother over who most looked like the evil villains in the opening credits. "No, YOU do!"
John, USA

Shaggy and Scoob in the waxworks. Run into the evil ghost, who threatens to turn them into dummies. Shaggy says "but we're dummies already, look..." and they proceed to pull lots of really stupid faces!
Chris, UK

You may already know this, but I recently read an article where the creators of the series stated that the Scooby-Doo character was inspired by London-born Bob Hope. Actually, after the cowardly custard characters who always come through when the going gets tough, which Bob Hope turned into his trademark throughout his film career. Best wishes.
Mary Holland, USA

Shaggy - a role model for us first generation watchers and now 40-somethings.
Mark, UK

I am 32, and I can honestly say that I still enjoy this cartoon as much as I did when I was three or four-years-old watching on Saturday morning TV. I'm not sure if I will go see the new Scooby Doo movie...I am a fan of the original series (pre-Scrappy-Doo and other incarnations) and I'm sure the movie will only be a mockery. I am particularly fond of the "original" Velma...the actress escapes me, but she is the voice in the earliest episodes and somewhat later ones. Her whiny, geekish voice especially complimented Shaggy. It amazes me that, for the last several years, there seems to be a resurgence of Scooby-Doo marketing, and I am happy that my favourite cartoon still lives on.
Billie, USA

Definitely a big part of my prolific children's TV diet. Late 80s through to mid-nineties I remember coming home from school, tumbling onto the sofa, coat still on and watching Scooby-Doo with my sister. We loved the "serious" ones - the scary mysteries without the canned laughter. Even then we had a kind of anti-Scrappy-Doo campaign going on!
Geoffrey, Wales

See also:

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