BBC NEWS Americas Africa Europe Middle East South Asia Asia Pacific
BBCi NEWS   SPORT   WEATHER   WORLD SERVICE   A-Z INDEX     

BBC News World Edition
 You are in: Entertainment  
News Front Page
Africa
Americas
Asia-Pacific
Europe
Middle East
South Asia
UK
Business
Entertainment
Science/Nature
Technology
Health
-------------
Talking Point
-------------
Country Profiles
In Depth
-------------
Programmes
-------------
BBC Sport
BBC Weather
SERVICES
-------------
EDITIONS
Thursday, 30 May, 2002, 12:52 GMT 13:52 UK
Spider-Man targeted by web pirates
Ewan McGregor and Hayden Christensen appear in Star Wars
Some Star Wars fans could not wait for its release
About 10 million people have attempted to download copies illegally of blockbusters Spider-Man and the new Star Wars film, a new report estimates.

And of those, the report says that between two to three million successfully finished the operation allowing them to watch the whole movie.

The Copyright Crusade II report, compiled by US research company Viant, will send alarm bells ringing through the film industry as studios attempt to stave off the threat of internet piracy.

The report suggests between 400,000 and 600,00 film copies are downloaded each day from illegal internet sites.

This is up on last year's figures, when the highest estimate was 500,000 a day.

Spider-Man
Spider-Man was on the web before it hit cinemas
The first version of Spider-Man to appear on the internet was reported on 2 May, one day before it opened in the US and was a version taken by a hand-held video camera from inside a cinema.

May has been a particularly busy time for bootleggers with about nine million users surfing the web for new films, according to Viant.

The majority of the downloads are being transferred over internet channels such as usenet, IRC, Gnutella and FastTrack, which allow files to be shared by millions around the world.

'Theft is theft'

The problem is mainly focused on the American market, where widespread broadband connections make it a faster and simpler process.

The Motion Picture Alliance of America (MPAA) has shown particular concern about the rise in film piracy, believing the industry is losing more than $3bn (2m) in worldwide revenue.

Its president Jack Valenti recently spoke to a US Congress committee about its attempts to stamp out piracy but also its intention to embrace new technology.

"Movie producers and distributors are filled with optimism over the prospect of the internet as another new delivery system to dispatch their movies to consumers, at a fair and reasonable price," he said.

"Consumers ultimately benefit from these endeavors because they will enjoy more choices for accessing the movies they want in high-quality digital format."

He also urged the committee to "send a clear message of deterrence that theft is theft, whether conducted online or off".

See also:

05 May 02 | Entertainment
07 May 02 | Entertainment
07 May 02 | Entertainment
07 Mar 01 | Entertainment
27 May 02 | Science/Nature
Internet links:


The BBC is not responsible for the content of external internet sites

Links to more Entertainment stories are at the foot of the page.


E-mail this story to a friend

Links to more Entertainment stories

© BBC ^^ Back to top

News Front Page | Africa | Americas | Asia-Pacific | Europe | Middle East |
South Asia | UK | Business | Entertainment | Science/Nature |
Technology | Health | Talking Point | Country Profiles | In Depth |
Programmes