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EDITIONS
Tuesday, 21 May, 2002, 15:32 GMT 16:32 UK
US gets new BBC realilty show
Taransay
The original series was based on the island of Taransay
The BBC is to make a new Castaway-style TV series, in partnership with the cable channel Discovery.

The series, in which teams of contestants will have to escape from a remote Scottish island, is set to start shooting this summer.

Castaway
In Castaway, 36 people had to brave the rigours of island life
But only US citizens will be allowed to participate in Escape From Experiment Island, which is aimed at the North American market.

The series will be filmed on Rhum, north west Scotland, which has a population of fewer than 30 people.

Two teams of four people will use their technical ingenuity and survival skills to try to be the first off the island.

'Thrilling escape'

Discovery's The Learning Channel, which is already advertising for participants in the series, said on its website: "Each team must overcome a series of challenges to get to an escape craft that will take one, and only one, team off the island.

"Each group of contestants will spend a week building a series of adventurous experimental devices that will help them on their way to a thrilling escape. They might have to build a hot air-balloon, send a message with Morse code, create a signal flare out of household chemicals, or power a dead radio."

But in a departure from the original Castaway, the teams will be housed in the relative luxury of Edwardian Kinloch Castle.

The island of Rhum was bought by the Nature Conservancy Council (now called Scottish Natural Heritage) in 1957 and has become an outdoor laboratory for the study of rocks, plants, birds and animals.

Once known as The Forbidden Isle, it is still protected from tourists by strict access rules.

See also:

20 May 02 | Entertainment
11 Sep 01 | Entertainment
19 Jun 01 | Entertainment
18 Sep 00 | Entertainment
29 Jul 00 | Scotland
10 Jul 00 | Entertainment
06 Jan 00 | Entertainment
19 Mar 98 | Business
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