BBC NEWS Americas Africa Europe Middle East South Asia Asia Pacific Arabic Spanish Russian Chinese Welsh
BBCi CATEGORIES   TV   RADIO   COMMUNICATE   WHERE I LIVE   INDEX    SEARCH 

BBC NEWS
 You are in:  Entertainment: Arts
Front Page 
World 
UK 
UK Politics 
Business 
Sci/Tech 
Health 
Education 
Entertainment 
Showbiz 
Music 
Film 
Arts 
TV and Radio 
New Media 
Reviews 
Talking Point 
In Depth 
AudioVideo 


Commonwealth Games 2002

BBC Sport

BBC Weather

SERVICES 
Wednesday, 8 May, 2002, 06:47 GMT 07:47 UK
Skateboarding artist wins Beck's prize
Toby Paterson
Toby Paterson's work is displayed on a 69ft wall
An artist who created a 69 foot-long wall painting has won the UK's largest prize for art in the Beck's Futures 2002 awards.

Toby Paterson collected a cheque for 24,000 from Icelandic singer Bjork at a ceremony held at London's Institute of Contemporary Art (ICA).

He won the award for his dramatic wall painting entitled We Fall Into Patterns Quickly, a painting on Perspex of a school, and a stack of tiles depicting fictional building fragments called We Fall In Patterns Too Quickly.

The 28-year-old has so far had a varied artistic career, having recently designed and constructed a skateboard park in Glasgow as well as exhibiting across Scotland and in New York.

We Fall in Patterns Too Quickly
We Fall in Patterns Too Quickly was another of Paterson's entries
He says much of his work is influenced by his own journeys into skateboarding.

The Beck's Futures award was set up 17 years ago to support emerging contemporary artists.

It encourages experimentation and innovation in all fields of modern art.

'My round'

The judges for this year's awards included 60s icon Marianne Faithful and artist Julian Opie, who is best known for his work on a Blur album sleeve.

Asked what he will do with his prize money, Mr Paterson said: "Get my car re-sprayed - it's a Saab 99 from 1983. I'll also live on it and pay for materials and my studio and buy everyone at the ICA a drink."

Fashion designer Wayne Hemingway handed Anja Kirschner a cheque for 2,000 for winning the student prize for film and video.

Four student artists were due to win 500, but the standard of the competition was so high the judges felt compelled to double the number of winners to eight.

The exhibition of winning entries will continue at the ICA until 12 May, before moving to the CCA in Glasgow and the Mappin Gallery in Sheffield later in the year.

See also:

12 Oct 01 | Arts
The Brits and modern art
Internet links:


The BBC is not responsible for the content of external internet sites

Links to more Arts stories are at the foot of the page.


E-mail this story to a friend

Links to more Arts stories