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Commonwealth Games 2002

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Wednesday, 20 February, 2002, 09:04 GMT
Concerns resurface over Glastonbury
Glastonbury
More than 140,000 are expected in 2002
The Glastonbury Festival may be forced to reapply for its entertainment licence if a firm brought in to provide security is withdrawn, the local authority has warned.

Mendip District Council has strongly advised the festival not to put tickets for this year's event on sale on Friday until the security arrangements have been clarified.

Festival organiser Michael Eavis is reported to be re-negotiating the terms of involvement of live music firm Mean Fiddler following reports that the company wanted a larger stake in the event.

Mr Eavis told BBC News Online on Tuesday that he wanted to make sure his event's celebrated identity did not disappear after fears that the festival could be swallowed up by the commercial music empire.

Live music giant Mean Fiddler has recently taken a 20% stake in the festival, said to rise to 40% in three years.

'Considerable concern'

Mr Eavis enlisted Melvin Benn, of Mean Fiddler, to be Glastonbury's operations director and control security.

Mendip District Council has expressed "considerable concern" over reports that Mean Fiddler may be ousted from arrangements.

The council said the firm "were an integral part of the licence application".

"If the council is not satisfied with the alternative arrangements Glastonbury Festival proposes for site management this may have to be referred to a reconvened meeting of the Regulatory Board," a statement from the authority said.

It added that local police had "serious concerns regarding the reported withdrawal of Mean Fiddler".

Mr Eavis said he called the meeting because Mean Fiddler "weren't quite clear about what the arrangements were".

The festival's future has been in the balance because of safety concerns, and security has to be watertight this year if the event is to survive.

Mr Eavis has run the event on his Somerset dairy farm for 30 years, with this year's event expected to attract 140,000 people.

It will take place on 28-30 June, with Blur, Radiohead and Stereophonics among the bands rumoured to be appearing.


Talking PointTALKING POINT
Glastonbury
Has the spirit of the festival changed forever?
 VOTE RESULTS
Should Mean Fiddler be involved in Glastonbury?

Yes
 22.10% 

No
 77.90% 

1733 Votes Cast

Results are indicative and may not reflect public opinion

See also:

19 Feb 02 | Music
Glastonbury fights for identity
19 Feb 02 | Music
Fiddler calls the tune
25 Jan 02 | Music
Green light for Glastonbury
20 Aug 01 | Business
Mean Fiddler eyes global expansion
04 Jan 01 | Entertainment
The Glastonbury legend
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