BBC NEWS Americas Africa Europe Middle East South Asia Asia Pacific Arabic Spanish Russian Chinese Welsh
BBCi CATEGORIES   TV   RADIO   COMMUNICATE   WHERE I LIVE   INDEX    SEARCH 

BBC NEWS
 You are in: Entertainment: Arts
Front Page 
World 
UK 
UK Politics 
Business 
Sci/Tech 
Health 
Education 
Entertainment 
Showbiz 
Music 
Film 
Arts 
TV and Radio 
New Media 
Reviews 
Talking Point 
In Depth 
AudioVideo 


Commonwealth Games 2002

BBC Sport

BBC Weather

SERVICES 
Thursday, 25 October, 2001, 16:55 GMT 17:55 UK
Art dealer Wildenstein dies
Wildenstein catalogued Monet, among others
One of the world's most famous art dealers, Daniel Wildenstein, has died aged 84.

He died in Paris on Tuesday following complications from surgery, the Wildenstein Institute said.

Wildenstein, also a renowned art historian, had just completed a work on Paul Gauguin, which was published on Wednesday, the day after his death.

Daniel Wildenstein
Daniel Wildenstein: Third in the dynasty
Private funeral services are planned for next week in Paris.

Wildenstein had an impressive art collection, but also headed various art projects including research on artists and sponsored the publication of a survey of 17th and 18th Century art.

His family, based in New York, have been key figures in the art world for more than a century.

The family currently maintains both the Wildenstein Gallery and the Pace Wildenstein Gallery, both in Manhattan.

It was Wildenstein's grandfather Nathan who first built up a collection of 18th Century French art in the late 19th Century.

Court cases

He established himself with galleries in Paris, Tokyo and New York.

His son Georges brought a library of rare art books and photographic archives into the family business.

Daniel developed the family's art collection and published catalogues about the works of Monet, Renoir, Von Dongen and other artists.

Despite a desire for privacy, Wildenstein's family has been in the news frequently in recent years in connection with a number of court cases, both on professional and personal issues.

The family is currently defending a New York case brought by the heirs of a prominent Jewish art collector, Alphonse Kann, who claim that eight manuscripts dating from the 15th, 16th and 17th Centuries belong to them, not the Wildensteins.

See also:

06 Sep 01 | Arts
'Nazi loot' case to go ahead
Internet links:


The BBC is not responsible for the content of external internet sites

Links to more Arts stories are at the foot of the page.


E-mail this story to a friend

Links to more Arts stories