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Friday, 17 August, 2001, 10:17 GMT 11:17 UK
Explosive Tiny Dynamite
Tiny Dynamite
Tiny Dynamite is playing at the Traverse
By BBC News Online's Olive Clancy in Edinburgh

Tiny Dynamite, currently wowing theatre-goers at Edinburgh, is the story of two friends, bruised by life, who meet up yearly to take stock of their lives.

Lucien (Scott Graham) is shy, the kind of man who has window-boxes and tries to ground Anthony (Steven Hoggett) who is edgy, unstable and a self-confessed drop-out.

They take a holiday and tell each other stories about bizarre coincidences and brushes with death.

The whole play seems to revolve around the story of a man who throws a half-eaten sandwich over the edge of the Empire State Building which then gathers enough force to kill a passer-by.

Scott Graham and Jasmine Hyde
Hoggett and Graham co-directed the play
One of the men - Lucien - tries to apply a logical cause to the increasingly unbelievable stories of the other.

Both men are preoccupied by the suicide years before of a female friend.

Into their lives comes Madeline (Jasmine Hyde), who bears a curious resemblance to the dead friend and soon the pair are locked in a stand-off over her affections.

This beautifully written play is the work of 33-year-old Abi Morgan, also the author of last year's Fringe sensation Splendour.

It is also beautifully performed - Hyde in particular has a real star quality.

Risk

Set to a soundtrack of a calibre more usually associated with film, the movement has an elegance akin to choreography.

Perhaps this could be expected from a collaboration between Paines Plough - a company specialising in new writing and Frantic Assembly, renowned for their physical theatre.

Tiny Dynamite meanders towards a realisation that risk is necessary, that stability is not necessarily the best way.

Nothing particularly explosive about these revelations.

But the means of getting there is sparkling.

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