BBC NEWS Americas Africa Europe Middle East South Asia Asia Pacific Arabic Spanish Russian Chinese Welsh
BBCi CATEGORIES   TV   RADIO   COMMUNICATE   WHERE I LIVE   INDEX    SEARCH 

BBC NEWS
 You are in:  Entertainment
Front Page 
World 
UK 
UK Politics 
Business 
Sci/Tech 
Health 
Education 
Entertainment 
Showbiz 
Music 
Film 
Arts 
TV and Radio 
New Media 
Reviews 
Talking Point 
In Depth 
AudioVideo 


Commonwealth Games 2002

BBC Sport

BBC Weather

SERVICES 
Thursday, 6 August, 1998, 17:01 GMT 18:01 UK
'Dinosaur' dig at opera stars
Three tenors
Huge dinosaurs?
Leading lights in the world of opera have been criticised by a British director Dr Jonathan Miller for being "Jurassic Park performers".

The writer and theatre director has called the industry's big names "huge dinosaurs" who arrive "with shreds of primeval vegetation hanging from their jaws".

Top singers 'inflexible'

Jonathan Miller
Jonathan Miller: condemns uninspired performances
The complaints highlight what he perceives to be uninspired delivery from ageing stars.

Dr Miller, who has also directed several well-received productions including Cosi Fan Tutte at the Royal Opera House, avoiding name any specific performers in his interview with Classic FM Magazine.

But it appears that his comments were directed at top names on the circuit, possibly including The Three Tenors who make brief star appearances at the major opera houses.

Audiences under attack

Dr Miller also criticised the new audiences which have been attracted to opera by these populist performers, saying they know little about opera.

He dismissed the growing army of fans belonging to Luciano Pavarotti, Placido Domingo and Jose Carreras as "an audience of the sort that applauds when the curtain goes up".

His comments may prove controversial for Classic FM, a radio station which has aimed to make classical music, including opera, more accessible to a wider audience.

Nick Shave, of Classic FM Magazine, said that the comments were likely to create some lively debate among the magazine's readers.

"I think it's an interesting view, and one that our readers who like this sort of music might find controversial. But I am sure they will believe that there are other points of view to be listened to," he said.

 WATCH/LISTEN
 ON THIS STORY
BBC News
Musician and writer Meirion Bowen: Opera devalued to circus status
BBC News
John Graham Hall of the ENO: Nothing to fear from populist performances
Links to more Entertainment stories are at the foot of the page.


E-mail this story to a friend

Links to more Entertainment stories