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Monday, 30 July, 2001, 14:13 GMT 15:13 UK
Brass Eye's controversial clips
Brass Eye
A "paedophile" is seen stalking children in the show
Politicians and child protection groups have attacked Brass Eye - Channel 4's spoof documentary about the media's reaction to paedophiles - as offensive.
BBC News Online looks at the content of the programme which has angered so many people.

The makers of Brass Eye say they set out to portray the way the media sensationalises issues surrounding paedophilia.

But critics have slammed what they have called "graphic" footage used in the satire.

Here are some of the controversial scenes included in the Channel 4 show:

  • A "paedophile" is imprisoned in stocks while a young boy is paraded in front of him. He says he does not fancy the boy.

  • A "paedophile" is seen preying on young children.

  • Two girls say they are not worried that a popstar they like, JLB8, is a paedophile. "Like we care," one says.

  • A toddler, supposedly a contestant in an American beauty pageant, is shown - with a blurring disguise - to have had breast implants.

  • A "paedophile" is released from jail and is set upon by a mob. They place him in a wicker phallus, set it alight and dance around it.

  • The presenter, played by Chris Morris, brings in his own children and locks them in a cabinet to keep them safe.

  • A rocket is fired into space supposedly with paedophile Sidney Cooke on board. It is then announced a mistake has been made, and a young boy has been sent up with him by accident.

  • The former head of the obscene publication branch, Michael Hames, was asked to give his opinion on whether artworks were obscene or not obscene. These included pictures of naked adults with the heads of young children.

  • Capital radio DJ Dr Fox said that paedophiles were genetically closer to crabs than humans. "There's no real evidence for it, but it's a scientific fact," he said.

  • Comedian Richard Blackwood said: "Online paedophiles can actually make your keyboard release toxic vapours that actually make you more suggestible."
    After smelling the keyboard, he added: "Now I actually feel more suggestible. And that was just from one sniff."

  • Ex-footballer Gary Lineker explained that paedophiles used special text message codes such as the Baltimora. Lineker added: "This means I'm running at them now with my trousers down."

  • As Morris questions a "paedophile" he uses an assortment of euphemisms for sex acts.

  • TV presenter Phillipa Forrester, holding up a T-shirt printed with a child's body, said: "Wearing a T-shirt like this the paedophile can disguise himself as a child."

  • Celebrities, including ITN newsreader Nicholas Owen and presenter Kate Thornton, condemn a fictional internet game called Pantou, which supposedly allows "online paedophiles" to see and even touch any children playing in the game.

  • See also:

    30 Jul 01 | TV and Radio
    Channel 4 satire row escalates
    30 Jul 01 | TV and Radio
    What does the ITC do?
    29 Jul 01 | TV and Radio
    Paedophile spoof 'counterproductive'
    18 Jul 01 | TV and Radio
    Star consults lawyers over TV spoof
    04 Oct 00 | Entertainment
    Channel 4 comedy 'unacceptable'
    27 Jul 01 | TV and Radio
    TV satire sparks 1,500 complaints
    28 Jul 01 | TV and Radio
    Channel 4 defends 'sick' satire
    27 Jul 01 | UK
    Chris Morris: Brass Neck
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